Hi, I'm new here and hoping I can get some help with the T1 settings. I just purchased the Bose L1 compact and the T1 a couple of weeks ago. So far i LOVE it! But i just don't know how to set up the T1 settings to get the best sound possible. I've been playing music for years and have had limited experience with sound. It's always been, turn buttons and see how it sounds. So I don't understand  what the numbers mean regarding the highs, lows, mids, etc, and where they should be set. I know where to find the mics and guitar. ( we're using 2  Shure sm 58 mics and I'm playing a Taylor 814ce.) But then I just turn buttons trying to find that sweet spot! My friend and I are playing our first Buskerfest in 2 weeks. It's an outdoors event and we want to get the best sound possible. But neither of us is a sound engineer, unfortunately! So, is there anyway someone can guide us with getting it set up so that it will have the best possible sound? Any info and advice would be greatly appreciated! Right now we are practicing in my 12x12 music room. Haven't tried it outdoors. Thanks in advance!

Original Post

Hi Jo,

Welcome to the community. I'm glad you joined us.

Jo posted:

Hi, I'm new here and hoping I can get some help with the T1 settings. I just purchased the Bose L1 compact and the T1 a couple of weeks ago. So far i LOVE it! But i just don't know how to set up the T1 settings to get the best sound possible.

The first things you want to do:

  1. Select the correct ToneMatch Presets for your inputs. For example:
    1. T1® Channel 1 - Vocal Mics / SM 58
    2. T1® Channel 2 - Vocal Mics / SM 58
    3. T1® Channel 3 - Taylor Guitars / Grand Audit (either finger or strum whichever sounds best to you)
  2. Set the input trim settings for each channel. We have a video to help you with that.


    The same principles apply to the guitar.
    You can read about all of this in more detail here: T1® Gain Staging

I've been playing music for years and have had limited experience with sound. It's always been, turn buttons and see how it sounds. So I don't understand  what the numbers mean regarding the highs, lows, mids, etc, and where they should be set.

It's not much different with the T1® except you've probably got more options with the T1® than you might have had with other gear in the past.

Start with steps 1 and 2 above and then set the zEQ and ParaEQ settings to 0 or bypass. Turn on the FX Mute buttons for all three channels. We are trying to start with all the settings flat before we make changes.

Turn up the volume to performance level. This may be a little too loud for your 12x12 room. You are trying to simulate performance conditions while you are learning how your system sounds. 

I know where to find the mics and guitar. ( we're using 2  Shure sm 58 mics and I'm playing a Taylor 814ce.) But then I just turn buttons trying to find that sweet spot!

Yes, that's the approach. Start with the vocals and listen to the tone and the way the voices blend.  You can fine-tune the tone with the zEQ, but if things sound good, you don't have to change anything. Then bring in the guitar and do some fine tuning if necessary.  You shouldn't have to make any big changes (changes greater than +/- 6 dB), and it's better to reduce what you don't want to hear rather than add sounds that you do. 

The ParaEQ is best for problem-solving. You probably won't need to use it for vocals or guitar unless you have a hot/resonant note on the guitar.

After you have the tone you like, then you can experiment with effects. Don't feel you have to use effects, but most people start with a little reverb.

Less is more.

My friend and I are playing our first Buskerfest in 2 weeks. It's an outdoors event and we want to get the best sound possible. But neither of us is a sound engineer, unfortunately! So, is there anyway someone can guide us with getting it set up so that it will have the best possible sound? Any info and advice would be greatly appreciated! Right now we are practicing in my 12x12 music room. Haven't tried it outdoors. Thanks in advance!

Is that the kind of information you wanted?

ST

Hi! Yes! This is very helpful! We have definitely been experimenting with the different options. And we use a little reverb for voices and guitar. But thanks so much for breaking it down in a way that helps us to better understand what it is we need to do. We are going to set up outside this week to get a better idea of how it sounds.

One more question; I own a L.R. Baggs DI acoustic preamp. I'm wondering if it would beneficial now that I'm plugging directly into the T1?

https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/VenueDI

Hi Jo,

Great! I'm happy to hear the information was helpful.

When you get outdoors, you may find you need less reverb. Reverb has the tendency to make you sound farther away as it creates the impression of spaciousness. You don't need either as much outdoors.

I would definitely try running your guitar straight into the T1® instead of using the L.R. Baggs DI acoustic preamp. Some people use devices like this. I found no longer needed it once I got my T1®.

Note - there's a tuner setting in the T1®.

T1 Tuner on Channel 3

If you have your guitar connected to T1® Channel 3,

  • Press the Channel 3 CH Edit button
  • Turn the Rotary Selector to Tuner


Enjoy!

ST

Attachments

Photos (1)

Okay. Thanks! We will definitely make sure we don't overuse reverb. And I was thinking the same thing regarding the DI box. That's one less piece of equipment and cable that I have to hook up and have in my way!

I saw the T1 tuner. Just haven't figured out how to use it yet. Can you help me with that? I have my guitar on Channel 1 and turned the knob to tuner but then I'm lost. Also, can you suggest which guitar option I should be using? There's only one Taylor listed and that's the T5. I have the 815ce with the ES. I'm wondering which option would give me the best sound.

Hi Jo,

There's a separate Preset category for Taylor Guitars.

  1.  Press CH Edit for Channel 1
  2. Turn the Rotary Selector to ToneMatch
  3. Turn the left most button under the display (Category) until you see Taylor Guitars. (It's probably second last). Press the button.
  4. Turn the right most button under the display (Preset) until you see a Preset you want to try. (eg. Grand Audit Strummmed or Grand Audit Fing).



To turn on the Tuner

  1.  Press CH Edit for Channel 1
  2. Turn the Rotary Selector to Tuner



Doing okay?

ST

Attachments

Photos (2)
Jo posted:

Okay. Thanks! We will definitely make sure we don't overuse reverb. And I was thinking the same thing regarding the DI box. That's one less piece of equipment and cable that I have to hook up and have in my way!

Hi Jo,

ST's given you some really good advice here and the only thing I would query would be regarding the LR-Baggs DI box, if it's the one you gave us the link to (Venue).

I would generally tend to agree with the less is more way of looking at things but I've just had a good look at the specs of it and I personally would try it out together with the T1. My reasons for this way of thinking are as follows:

1) Onboard tuner with footswitch mute/tune function

2) Phase inversion (can be really good for feedback control)

3) Adjustable volume boost footswitch (can be set for a bit more gain when soloing or to set for the times when you're fingerpicking rather than strumming)

4) Full isolation audio transformer-coupled DI (most guitars only have a non-symmetrical output so here you can use a normal mono guitar cable and be symmetrical directly after the box.

5) Ground lift function (for those times where you might have ground loop problems - hum/buzz).

6) Onboard tuner with a footswitch mute/tune function gives you the chance to retune your guitar (muted) without playing with the T1 (and you can probably see it better than on the T1)

All these are things which you have directly at your control without having to fiddle around with the T1. This can be a real bonus if you're sharing the T1 with someone. 

The notch filter for example gives you the chance to address a second problem frequency (the T1 basically gives you the chance to address just one frequency).

These are just a few thoughts regarding using the DI-Preamp or not. If you've already thought about these things and decided that you don't need them OK, but if not it might be worth considering if any of the features could be helpful to you on stage before discarding the idea of using something that you already have.

As I've already said, these are just my views on the subject. Sometimes I'll play really light and just use a microphone into Channel 1 on the Compact and a guitar into Channel 2. It works perfectly, but sometimes I do find that I really miss the ease of having some of the things I've left out for that gig.

I hope that this has been of some help.

Tony

Hi Tony, Yes, the DI box i linked is the one I own. You've made some very good points here! I hadn't considered all the benefits of using the box. Especially the easy tuner access. I think I'll give it a try! I'm so happy  I found you guys! Very knowledgeable and helpful! Thanks so much!

Hi Jo,

Like ST, I'm glad you've joined the community.

Jo posted:

Hi Tony, Yes, the DI box i linked is the one I own. You've made some very good points here! I hadn't considered all the benefits of using the box. Especially the easy tuner access.

That's one of the big advantages of our community. Quite often someone will come up with an idea that hadn't occurred in our thoughts or plans. It's quite often that you don't realize how useful something is to you until it's not there any more.

I think I'll give it a try! I'm so happy  I found you guys! Very knowledgeable and helpful! Thanks so much!

I followed the forum for several years before buying my first L1 + T1 (the first one was a Compact (in 2011 I think). It was due to all the help being offered here that I bought my first one, and I've been on the forum now for nearly 4 years, hopefully helping others as I was helped in the beginning.

We all learn from each other, and any feedback (positive or negative results) regarding problems which have been discussed is something which helps to share the knowledge which has accumulated here over the years.

I look forward to hearing about your experience with the system over time.

Tony

I'm confused regarding the LR Baggs DI box. I'm wondering, once I have all my channels set up on the T1 mixer, do I need to adjust any of the setting on the DI box? I mean..it seems if I have programmed channels on the mixer, wouldn't adjusting levels on the DI box also affect the sounds I have already set up on the mixer? Sorry for my lack of knowledge on  the subject. I'm trying to understand how it works.

RDHmusic posted:

I just got the L1 and T1 with the B2.  I need to have two mics, two acoustic guitars, and  one Zoom Drum box.  Which ones should I hook up to 4/5? 

@Hi RDHmusic,

so as not to derail this thread unnecessarily I've created a new one for you.

what to connect to which inputs when using a T1 tonematch + L1

Just click on the link and it will take you directly to your thread. I've already given you the first answer. I hope this helps.

Tony

Jo posted:

I'm confused regarding the LR Baggs DI box. I'm wondering, once I have all my channels set up on the T1 mixer, do I need to adjust any of the setting on the DI box? I mean..it seems if I have programmed channels on the mixer, wouldn't adjusting levels on the DI box also affect the sounds I have already set up on the mixer? Sorry for my lack of knowledge on  the subject. I'm trying to understand how it works.

Hi Jo,

If you make use of the EQ possibilities on the Venue - Yes there would be a difference. If you're happy with the EQ from the T1 just set the Venue EQ gains to 12 o' clock and there should be no audible difference.

Any type of EQ'ing you do on the Venue will of course affect the T1.

As you have a slightly longer signal chain when using the Venue you'll have to gain-stage a bit differently. For instance, if you make use of the "Boost" function you'll have to take that into consideration. What I mean by this is that when you set the channel input trim you should do it with the boost engaged so that you have the loudest signal that the channel will be receiving. This way you shouldn't be clipping the signal when you boost the guitar signal.

Don't be afraid to try stuff out. If you have the chance to have a test run at gig volume do so. It will take away some of the uncertainty you may have at the beginning. There's no Voodoo here. Basically it's not too complicated, and your ears will tell you how it sounds. If you have a digital recorder record your sound trials. That way you'll be able to hear how it sounds without your singing voice in your head. Doing this will also help you to get the sound levels right for the mix. At a pinch you could record with a mobile phone and listen to the results through earbuds or headphones.

Has this helped in any way?

Tony

Hi Tony,

Yes! All the info has been very helpful! I'm still tweaking. And I have also been recording using my phone. I'm happy with the vocals but I can never seem to get my guitar to sound as good as I would like it to sound. I mean....it's a great guitar! But I guess I expect too much. I'm wanting the kind of acoustic sound you hear when the pros perform. Lol. It definitely sounds better live than the recorded version on the phone. It's mostly when I capo at the 4th or 5th fret. I hope to set up outside this weekend and see how it sounds. Thanks so much for your helpl!

Jo posted:

Hi Tony,

Yes! All the info has been very helpful! I'm still tweaking. And I have also been recording using my phone. I'm happy with the vocals but I can never seem to get my guitar to sound as good as I would like it to sound.

As guitarists we're almost never completely satisfied with our sound. I've been playing live for almost 50 years (started around 1969) and have always found it easier to EQ vocals than acoustic guitars. In the old days it was either with microphones (sounded better but massive problems with feedback on loud stages) or with magnetic pickups. It's always a compromise. As soon as you begin to amplify an acoustic instrument you have to compromise. It can never sound just like it does acoustically in a room without amplification. We're much nearer nowadays than we were when I first started, but there are still compromises to be made.

 

I mean....it's a great guitar! But I guess I expect too much. I'm wanting the kind of acoustic sound you hear when the pros perform. Lol.

When pros perform you don't generally get to see what they've got between the guitar and the mixer. Many usually have a really serious preamp in the chain. Nowadays really serious acoustic guitarists have multiple pick-up systems in their guitars and blend them together to get the sound you hear.

here's a link to a youtube clip demonstrating Mike Dawes' set-up. I actually met him this year and his sound really is amazing. Part of his set up is a Bose T1, although he told me that he's finding that he may need to go to a different mixer at some time to accommodate his need for even more inputs. He uses 3 different pick-up systems in his guitar.

Mike Dawes' acoustic guitar set-up using 3 pick-ups

It definitely sounds better live than the recorded version on the phone.

Don't expect too much from a mobile phone unless you're using one the the really good microphones that you can buy for use with them. The microphones on a mobile just aren't built for making quality music recordings. For iOS units there's the shure MV88 which has a Lightning connector. There's also the Apogee MiC which also has a USB connection. These are just 2 examples of external microphones for use with mobile phones. I personally use a digital recorder. I started off with a Zoom H2 and have moved on to a Zoom H6.

It's mostly when I capo at the 4th or 5th fret. I hope to set up outside this weekend and see how it sounds. Thanks so much for your helpl!

When you capo at the 4th or 5th fret, do you check the tuning in the guitar again. I quite often play up there and always check the tuning. Sometimes it's not necessary to retune, but there are times when it is. Just a thought.

Coming back to you're guitar, a Taylor 814 ce. Is that a newer model with the Expression System 2, or an older one with Expression System 1 installed? If it's got an Expression System 2, the Taylor Presets in the T1 are EQ'd for the Expression System 1 which is a magnetic system with a Humbucker under the neck where you can't see it, and movement sensors under the top which  also function magnetically but more like a microphone capsule. The Expression System 2 is a piezo system (albeit different from any other on the market. You may have to play around with the presets a bit if you're using a System 2 pick-up. You'll still probably never get it to sound like the professionals.

 Just keep tweaking until you're happy that you're getting a good sound. When tweaking the EQ, it's quite often better to reduce the level of certain frequencies rather than boosting others. Just remember one thing. Don't try to compare a Volkswagen with a Mercedes or Rolls Royce. The pros are using really high end gear. You can get a really good sound from a Compact (I know because I also have one and a Model II sounds even better) but you can't compete with what you hear when the pros are on stage without all the gear they're using that you can't see.

I hope this has helped.

Tony

Hi Tony,

I have the ES 2. And yeah, I dream about that heavenly acoustic sound like the pros get!  That said, I am pretty satisfied with the sound I'm hearing except when strumming while capo is at fret 4 or 5. Finger picking sounds great regardless! And I do check my tuning when using the capo. I'm pretty OCD about being in tune! Thanks for sharing that video! He has some serious gear! Love the freeze unit for sustaining! I will sometime, when ending a song, turn my volume button up a little to sustain. Once again, thanks a bunch for all the advice and info! I'm sure I will be back with more questions! For now I shall tweak on!

Jo posted:

Hi Tony,

I have the ES 2. And yeah, I dream about that heavenly acoustic sound like the pros get!  That said, I am pretty satisfied with the sound I'm hearing except when strumming while capo is at fret 4 or 5.

Jo, you don't specify what you don't like about the strumming sound. If it really bothers you to the stage of exasperation, have you tried changing the EQ when using the capo there to try to "tune" the sound more to your liking?. If not, try that out and if you find it to be better you can always save the scene to recall when you use the capo up there. Failing that, you might want to try out a graphic equalizer pedal for the times when you use the capo there. You could then kick that it when required and leave it off when not needed.

Finger picking sounds great regardless! And I do check my tuning when using the capo. I'm pretty OCD about being in tune!

I have a more complex set-up, but one which gives me basically endless set-ups at the touch of a footswitch. I use a Kemper profiler which I've programmed for all the guitars I use in the different situations that I use them. I have EQ set-ups for fingerpicking, strumming, a boost when I need it etc. I'm not suggesting that you take this path. What I'm saying is that if you use the instrument(s) differently and are really "picky" about your sound, you may want to think about how you can re-EQ your guitar quickly when changing e.g. from strumming to fingerpicking etc. I've never found one single setting that was perfect for everything, and if you scroll through the list of presets in the T1 you'll see that sometimes one preset for guitar X is named strumming and another for the same guitar is named fingerpicking. These are just thoughts, but they may help to put your thoughts on a slightly different line and eventually help you in your search for your particular "Holy Grail".

Thanks for sharing that video! He has some serious gear! Love the freeze unit for sustaining! I will sometime, when ending a song, turn my volume button up a little to sustain.

A compressor can also be used to sustain the note in such circumstances, rather than raising the volume. Or even just kicking in a reverb while the strings are still ringing. Have you thought of trying that out? Again, I'm not saying that this is a must, but many acoustic guitarists make really good use of effect pedals (there are some really good multi effect pedals on the market if you can't afford an arsenal of single ones). Such units are nearly always a slight compromise, but better that than not being able to do some of the things you'd like to. When I'm traveling really light, I sometimes just use a Zoom A3 acoustic pedal. It's got loads of effects in it, of which I make use of but a few. However, those that I use I find to be pretty helpful. Don't forget that most of us aren't playing on the really big stages with endless funding. It still doesn't mean that we can't or shouldn't make use of units which are at the lower end of the price chain (when compared to the professionals). When it really boils down to it, most of the people at our live gigs won't hear the difference between e.g. a chorus costing 50$ and one costing 250$.

These are all just thoughts and suggestions. What you do with them is up to you. My way of thinking is that it doesn't hurt to mention or consider them.

Once again, thanks a bunch for all the advice and info! I'm sure I will be back with more questions! For now I shall tweak on!

You're more than welcome to any advice or help that I can give. Just don't let ideology (tone wise) get in the way of your playing. Live is live. Amplified is not really acoustic as you hear it without pick-ups and microphones. PA's and amps are just there so that you can play to larger audiences than a handful of people in a living room and still be heard. Amplification has always got to incorporate compromises in sound. It's the search for a compromise that we can accept and basically be happy with. If there was only one way of doing things we'd have very little to choose from in the way of gear. There'd probably be very few things on offer and they might well only really differ in the build quality and reliability.

I'm going to leave it at that for now because I'm getting too philosophical. 

I hope that I've maybe given you some food for thought here, and that maybe the odd idea may be of help in some way or other.

Tony

PS Don't forget to let us know of anything that you may try out for yourself and like. You never know, someone here might find it to be helpful.

Hi Tony,

That's quite a bit of food for thought. But I appreciate it. It seems like no matter how much tweaking I do, it still sounds pretty much the same to my ears. I had an acoustic pedal. The Zoom A.2. But i just sold it. I never used it anymore. I bought a Digitech 500 pedal a few years back. It has lots of effects. Some acoustic. But I think it mostly works best with my Fender strat. I just don't want too many different pedals to deal with. It can get overwhelming. But you have piqued my interest in the graphic equalized pedal. Tell me more about it's effects, please.  I'm in search of THIS sound! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=12cUm2OwnPs As you can see she is playing her guitar at capo 5. But in reality, I know she isn't using a Bose L1 compact. Lol

Hi Jo,

Thanks for sharing that video.  I've had Taylors and Gibsons, and while Taylor and Gibson both make fine guitars, You can't expect a Taylor 814ce (a modern rosewood Grand Auditorium) to sound like a Gibson Hummingbird (a traditional mahogany square shouldered dreadnaught).

I'm not suggesting one is better than the other, but they are different. And I'm certain that Miranda Lambert's guitar has had the benefit of significant tweaking to get the sound we hear in the video. I expect we hear a better version of the guitar sound in the recording than the audience heard in that live venue.

Yes, we can be inspired to great heights by our instruments, and we can be distracted by them too. And once you're doing the show, you've got to play what you've got.

I believe your audience is enjoying your performance - your presence, your show. The few people who break it down into its components will probably notice and remark on your voice before they give your guitar tone a second thought.

About the best advice I've received on the subject was, "Stop playing the guitar. Play the song."

These days, when it comes to live shows, I appreciate the shortest, simplest path to connect with people in the audience. When I'm playing acoustic guitar, the T1® with the L1® - that does it for me.

ST

ST posted:

Hi Jo,

Thanks for sharing that video.  I've had Taylors and Gibsons, and while Taylor and Gibson both make fine guitars, You can't expect a Taylor 814ce (a modern rosewood Grand Auditorium) to sound like a Gibson Hummingbird (a traditional mahogany square shouldered dreadnaught).

I would agree with ST here regarding the comparison between the 2 guitars. You've also got 2 different pick-up systems here. A very recent taylor will have the Expression System 2 installed (piezo but installed behind the saddle with 3 adjusting screws for the sound which I'd leave completely alone unless you really know what you're doing). Due to its placing it doesn't sound as "quacky" a UST (under saddle transducer) which is what the Hummingbird will have if it's not been changed. I personally am not a fan of the UST piezos, but many people seem to like them. They definitely cut through in the mix when played in a band.

I'm not suggesting one is better than the other, but they are different. And I'm certain that Miranda Lambert's guitar has had the benefit of significant tweaking to get the sound we hear in the video. I expect we hear a better version of the guitar sound in the recording than the audience heard in that live venue.

Once again I agree with ST regarding the tweaking. At a guess I'd say what we're hearing comes out of the desk and not the loudspeakers, so it's not going to be what the audience hears.

Yes, we can be inspired to great heights by our instruments, and we can be distracted by them too. And once you're doing the show, you've got to play what you've got.

Very true again, and she's strumming with her fingers which sounds completely different to using a pick for example.

I believe your audience is enjoying your performance - your presence, your show. The few people who break it down into its components will probably notice and remark on your voice before they give your guitar tone a second thought.

This is a good insight. As a guitarist I may often listen critically to the tone of the guitar. If I'm not impressed by it I may find myself thinking about how it could be improved, but I'm an acoustic guitar player and am always interested in the sound of a live acoustic guitar. Most of the audience however will probably be listening to your performance as a whole and not breaking it down into its components of guitar and vocals. Generally more attention will be paid to the vocals than to the instrument.

About the best advice I've received on the subject was, "Stop playing the guitar. Play the song."

 

These days, when it comes to live shows, I appreciate the shortest, simplest path to connect with people in the audience. When I'm playing acoustic guitar, the T1® with the L1® - that does it for me.

ST

This is the only part where my views differ from ST's here. I'll play this way, and I'll sometimes leave out the T1 for absolute simplicity. Most of the time  I'll be happy with the sound of the guitar through the T1 but there are times when I feel I need a something that the T1 can't offer me. This is just a case of personal preference and not because the sound is bad. I also play mostly acoustic guitar in several different styles and it often helps me to have a greater choice than the T1 has to offer. 

Regarding a graphic equalizer. It just gives you more scope when EQ'ing. Their are more frequency bands which means that you can be more specific which frequencies you alter. Just remember one thing: it's usually better to decrease the level of certain frequencies than increasing other frequencies.

Does that help?

Tony 

Thanks guys! I have certainly enjoyed this conversation! I find it very interesting and helpful! I'm somewhat OCD when it comes to sound. I realize that's not necessarily a bad thing. But sometimes it can take the joy out of performing. I'm just going to try to relax a bit and enjoy my gig coming up this weekend! It's a Buskerfest! So it's supposed to be a fun event! Not playing big bucks!

Hi Jo,

I can basically think of no better chance of testing things out than at a Buskerfest. People really tend to be open minded at such events, and if you play it through a Bose L1 system you're almost certain to see a few raised eyebrows regarding your sound (and I mean this absolutely positively). There's almost always a few people in the audience and they're invariably blown away by the sound of an L1.

Just go out there knowing that your sound's going to be OK and have fun. It's not really ALL that long since professional acoustic musicians had a live sound which wouldn't have been better than what you're going to have.

As for the rest I can only repeat what ST has written about a Website and also maybe a gig report. We're always interested to read about how people get on when gigging with an L1.

Look forward to reading about it.

Tony

Add Reply

Likes (0)
Post
Having trouble signing in?

We recently updated our sign-in procedure and if you have old sign-in data cached, this can create a problem. Please:

  1. Clear your browser cache and cookies
  2. Then close the browser (not just the window)
  3. Open the browser and try again
Thank you

Please make sure that your profile is up to date
×
×
×
×