Discussions about the Bose S1 Pro system

Bose S1 Pro

Designed for musicians, DJs and general PA use, the S1 Pro is the ultimate all-in-one PA, floor monitor and practice amplifier that's ready to be your go-anywhere Bluetooth music system for nearly any occasion. 

This is the place to discuss the S1 Pro system.

There are several streams talking about how to run the L1 compact on a battery pack... but the specific units are no longer available... is there a more updayed recomendation?... just wish to do outfoor events... running the compact... a mini projector... a couple of lavs... thanks

Original Post

@Kaufmantales, first off, you require a pure sine wave inverter with ample power to support the sophisticated digital switching power supply of the Bose L1 Compact. This is the least expensive option that will support that:

https://www.amazon.com/Kinverc...ps%2C199&sr=8-14

 

Next, you will need enough deep cycle rechargeable battery power to last well beyond the length of your gig:

 

https://www.amazon.com/NPP-NPD...ps%2C202&sr=8-20

 

...and then you need a high current 12V reverse pulse battery charger to maintain the life of those batteries:

 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/prod...00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Hi again Ric... I was seeing before single units... like this..  COOLIS 200Wh-54000mAh Portable Purely Sine Wave Lithium Battery Power Inverter Generator Power Station, with Silent 110V AC/12V DC/5V USB Output..,

I appreciate that this may not be adequate... and, perhaps dangerous to the unit... however your recomendations are a bit more than I can afford for just a few events a year... the idea of having a highly portable small unit was inviting... but, perhaps I can thank you for saving my rig.

I believe, for the event I have planned... an outlet will be available...

I wish Bose would create a battery pack for these units...! The freedom would br appreciated.., 

best

 

 

 

I have 2 options that I use.I bought a Wen 2000 Inverter gas powered which runs very quiet at around 50db and I also have the Duracell Pro Powerpack 1300 which is available for around 199 at Walmart and others.WIth the wen I can run for hours on 1 gallon of gas and the Duracell I get about 3 hrs out of.

Please check that your alternate power source uses a pure sine wave inverter. 

Inverters can be pretty abusive to many systems. Many create a “stepped sine wave” (the red trace below). Those edges can wreak havoc in many electronic systems, especially switching amps and other circuits with critical timing requirements. They can also cause microprocessors to misbehave. Further, these waveforms can also age electrolytic caps much faster than true sine waves. We do not recommend the use of battery inverters for any electronics you care about.

Stepped Sine Wave.jpg

Source: Portable Power

jaswrx posted:

This little guy from Home Depot will power your L1 for a decent amount of time.  For $100, you get two batteries + inverter.

It is so small and light too!  Buying now.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iRCyXsuvdk0

This looks like an outstanding option!  I'll be picking one up to try with my new T4s.   The power supply for the T4 converts AC to 18V DC so I'm not worried about this not being a pure sine wave inverter.  This should be able to power the T4s for a while.  Couple this with 2 S1s running on their batteries, you've got a truly portable PA.

jaswrx, KingBiscuit,

You've been warned

Inverters can be pretty abusive to many systems. Many create a “stepped sine wave” (the red trace below). Those edges can wreak havoc in many electronic systems, especially switching amps and other circuits with critical timing requirements. They can also cause microprocessors to misbehave. Further, these waveforms can also age electrolytic caps much faster than true sine waves. We do not recommend the use of battery inverters for any electronics you care about.

Stepped Sine Wave.jpg

Source: Portable Power

A couple of questions I have on the quality of pure and modified sine wave inverters.

The vast majority of inverters are made in China and they all look somewhat similar, even between the cheap ones and the named brands like Xantrex, Samlex etc.

My first question is how can we tell if they're true pure sine wave as advertised ? Is there a gadget that can test these inverters for their advertised  purity and wattage ?

Im pretty sure the named brands are trustworthy but their prices are nearly prohibitive for the average musicians. 

'The other question is : has anyone ever experienced problems using modified sine wave on pa equipment? Has it happened to anyone that modified sine wave inverters caused damage to their equipment ?

The reason I ask is because I've seem numerous demos of djs/musicians  using modified sine wave inverters but have yet to see any report of damage. There was also a report that QSC engineers had confirmed that it was ok to use modified sine wave on their speakers. Could it be that the safety of using msw is dependent on how the equipment is made ?

 

I don't have experience using a modified sine wave inverter on PA equipment but I have, for years, used a modified sine wave inverter to run my CPAP machine while we're out camping with no ill affects.  It is similar, in my opinion, to what you would do if you ran your T1/4/8 power supply from an inverter. 

The component that is connected to the inverter is the power supply.  This power supply takes AC and converts it to 18 Volts DC.  The DC voltage is different on my CPAP, I think the current one is 24 Volts DC, but the concept  is the same.  

All that said, the cost difference in buying one of the aforementioned pure sine wave inverter/battery pack isn't worth the hassles of possibly voiding your warranty. 

KingBiscuit posted:

I don't have experience using a modified sine wave inverter on PA equipment but I have, for years, used a modified sine wave inverter to run my CPAP machine while we're out camping with no ill affects.  It is similar, in my opinion, to what you would do if you ran your T1/4/8 power supply from an inverter. 

The component that is connected to the inverter is the power supply.  This power supply takes AC and converts it to 18 Volts DC.  The DC voltage is different on my CPAP, I think the current one is 24 Volts DC, but the concept  is the same.  

All that said, the cost difference in buying one of the aforementioned pure sine wave inverter/battery pack isn't worth the hassles of possibly voiding your warranty. 

Good point about the warranty issue, however, as I said before, QSC was quoted as saying that it's ok to use modified sine wave on their products so I'd assume that would not be an issue. 

jaswrx posted:

just use a sine wave like the 2nd link I posted above or the more expensive one from Goal Yeto.

Thanks for the advice but it doesn't answer either of my questions.

BTW I do own the smaller version (200w vs 300w) of the one you referenced . I brought it from the same manufacturer in China and have used it to power my Carvin AG300 for a 2 hour outdoor gig with great results

Also I've used a Power It Battery Generator (500w psw) and a Duracell Powerpack Pro 1300 (600w msw) with similar results. Both units weight about the same @ 20lbs.

The Power It the most expensive but it's draining power at a rate of going from full charge to empty in about 10 days and I've had it for about 4 years now. The Duracell can hold a full charge for more than a couple of months.

This particular one you mentioned has the advantages of being cheapest and lightest but I've seen it advertised under various names and I'm just curious if that's a way that it can be tested for its claim of being pure sine wave.

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