Problems using CD Player for Backing Tracks

Hello Bose - Just received the PAS and experimenting with it. The clarity is amazing - I've had some very good comments from the 1st gig I did with it. I have a solo act with tenor and alto sax and use backtracks from a small portable CD player. The backtracks are critical to my act. Two things:

1). When I use a combiner jack to combine the L and R signals from the CD player into a mono signal to put into PAS channel 3 or 4, in some songs I lose certain instruments almost totally- ex: a song with a piano intro - the piano is so soft compared with the other instruments its almost not audible. When I connect the L and R signals into channels 3 and 4 directly this problem goes away. Am thinking of getting a cheap mixer so I only have to use one PAS channel for the CD player - any thoughts on why this is happening? Any other suggestions?

2). Problems with warmth and Bass response. At first when I plugged in the CD player I got all higher and some mid frequencies but almost no bass at all. I have a "DBB" (Dynamic Bass Boost) on the portable CD player - when I engage this the sound warms up and the bass appears. The strange thing is I did not have to do this with my previous PA system (Peavy Escort). There are other songs where the DBB causes too much distortion and I have to turn it off - but when I do I have no bass at all - the sound gets high and thin. I'm forced to choose between distortion or no bass. I'm concerned that this CD player's special feature (DBB) is necessary to get my tracks to sound good with the PAS - any ideas as to why this is happening?

Thanks alot.
Original Post
Hello SteveB

In answer to both of your points, it really sounds as though
- the outputs from your CD player are out of phase,
- or -
- there is something wrong the way your "combiner jack" is wired
and ... the result is that for solo instruments and lower frequencies generally, there will be signals from the two channels cancelling each other.

Debugging:
Have you tried a different CD player?
Have you tried a different "combiner jack"?
When you used your old system, did you run into separate channels (same as using channels 3/4)?

Question:
Do you need to keep one of channels 3 or 4 free for something else?

ST

JABPASFOPU
(just another Bose® Personalized Amplification System ™ Family of Products User)


quote:
Originally posted by STEVEB:
Hello Bose - Just received the PAS and experimenting with it. The clarity is amazing - I've had some very good comments from the 1st gig I did with it. I have a solo act with tenor and alto sax and use backtracks from a small portable CD player. The backtracks are critical to my act. Two things:

1). When I use a combiner jack to combine the L and R signals from the CD player into a mono signal to put into PAS channel 3 or 4, in some songs I lose certain instruments almost totally- ex: a song with a piano intro - the piano is so soft compared with the other instruments its almost not audible. When I connect the L and R signals into channels 3 and 4 directly this problem goes away. Am thinking of getting a cheap mixer so I only have to use one PAS channel for the CD player - any thoughts on why this is happening? Any other suggestions?

2). Problems with warmth and Bass response. At first when I plugged in the CD player I got all higher and some mid frequencies but almost no bass at all. I have a "DBB" (Dynamic Bass Boost) on the portable CD player - when I engage this the sound warms up and the bass appears. The strange thing is I did not have to do this with my previous PA system (Peavy Escort). There are other songs where the DBB causes too much distortion and I have to turn it off - but when I do I have no bass at all - the sound gets high and thin. I'm forced to choose between distortion or no bass. I'm concerned that this CD player's special feature (DBB) is necessary to get my tracks to sound good with the PAS - any ideas as to why this is happening?

Thanks alot.
ST - Yes, this makes perfect sense - I will try another CD player and/or jack and let you know. My previous system had separate RCA L/R plugs - so I didn't have to deal with the issue of combining the signals. The main reason I don't want to use both Ch 3 and 4 is that I am looking at getting an effects (reverb etc.) unit - and from the docs it looks like I will need to plug the output from that into Ch 3 or Ch 4.....

Thanks again...

quote:
Originally posted by ST:
Hello SteveB

In answer to both of your points, it really sounds as though
- the outputs from your CD player are out of phase,
- or -
- there is something wrong the way your "combiner jack" is wired
and ... the result is that for solo instruments and lower frequencies generally, there will be signals from the two channels cancelling each other.

Debugging:
Have you tried a different CD player?
Have you tried a different "combiner jack"?
When you used your old system, did you run into separate channels (same as using channels 3/4)?

Question:
Do you need to keep one of channels 3 or 4 free for something else?

ST

JABPASFOPU
(just another Bose® Personalized Amplification System ™ Family of Products User)


quote:
Originally posted by STEVEB:
Hello Bose - Just received the PAS and experimenting with it. The clarity is amazing - I've had some very good comments from the 1st gig I did with it. I have a solo act with tenor and alto sax and use backtracks from a small portable CD player. The backtracks are critical to my act. Two things:

1). When I use a combiner jack to combine the L and R signals from the CD player into a mono signal to put into PAS channel 3 or 4, in some songs I lose certain instruments almost totally- ex: a song with a piano intro - the piano is so soft compared with the other instruments its almost not audible. When I connect the L and R signals into channels 3 and 4 directly this problem goes away. Am thinking of getting a cheap mixer so I only have to use one PAS channel for the CD player - any thoughts on why this is happening? Any other suggestions?

2). Problems with warmth and Bass response. At first when I plugged in the CD player I got all higher and some mid frequencies but almost no bass at all. I have a "DBB" (Dynamic Bass Boost) on the portable CD player - when I engage this the sound warms up and the bass appears. The strange thing is I did not have to do this with my previous PA system (Peavy Escort). There are other songs where the DBB causes too much distortion and I have to turn it off - but when I do I have no bass at all - the sound gets high and thin. I'm forced to choose between distortion or no bass. I'm concerned that this CD player's special feature (DBB) is necessary to get my tracks to sound good with the PAS - any ideas as to why this is happening?

Thanks alot.

Hi Steve,

I understand about the effects. Just a suggestion though... adding reverb usually results in a loss of clarity (You said, "The clarity is amazing"). Try a few more gigs without the effects and you may be happier for not having them.

If you do decide you want them (less is more in this case), if the reverb unit provides a mix of the dry (original) and wet (effected) signals, then you could use the insert points in the PS1 Powerstand.

Or if you decide to get a small mixer you can route the effects through that.

Please let us know how it works out with the CD backing tracks.
Steve B- Let me jump in and tell you how I worked the CD player. Short of you having a CD player problem, I first started using CDs. I bought from Musiciansfriend.com the Horizon stereoline passive direct box. It allows for both channels of your CD player to be pugged in without using a "Y". Then I came out of the direct box with a mic cable to the PAS and into channel. I've also gone from the direct box into 3 or 4 with good results, but I liked the presets and equalizing on the remote to help with the sound. I've been able to also go into any channel with 1/4" with a "Y" and had good results, but I've been more comfortable using the direct box.

Singing Auctioneer

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