Discussions about the Bose S1 Pro system

Bose S1 Pro

Designed for musicians, DJs and general PA use, the S1 Pro is the ultimate all-in-one PA, floor monitor and practice amplifier that's ready to be your go-anywhere Bluetooth music system for nearly any occasion. 

This is the place to discuss the S1 Pro system.

Outdoor gig

Yesterday, I played 6 - 9 on the river side deck at a restaurant/bar. The area seats maybe 75. The new owners only book solo acoustic acts and stipulate "Not Loud". 

I used the S1 Pro on a short speaker stand with my Composite Acoustics Legacy in channel 2 and a Shure SM58 in channel 1 Tonematch set accordingly.

The gig went well, the owners liked me, crowd was decent but dropped off after 8.  I had the volume at right where the owner wanted it, which IMO was a little too quiet but they write the check so that's where it stayed.

I ran the S1 on battery for the entire gig and it was fine.  I was right next to an outlet just in case.  The guitar had tons of volume set at 1200 but the SM 58 was barely adequate at 3:00.   If fact, initially, I had the mic maxed and was concerned it wasn't enough.

Perhaps it's to reduce mic feedback but the gain in my mic seems to be very weak.  I tried it on both channels and tried a different SM58, it was the same.

Whether guitar or mic channels 1 and 2 both don't really kick in until you get above 12:00.  I read somewhere the reason behind this somewhere but can't find it now.

I'll try to get a power supply for my T1 and try running through that.  It might make the Mic/guitar balance a little easier and increase the overall performance of the S1.

Bottom line, the S1 Pro did the job.  My entire time from car to ready to play was 5 - 10 minutes, the owners were happy and I got paid.

Original Post

Thank you for the report. This is something I brought up on the S1 feature request thread. Bose should add an attention switch to boost lower output mics such as the SM58. 

When I tested the S1 with a SM58 I found the same thing to be true... the gain was maxed out and it was barely enough juice to do the job.

BTW the Beta 58a gives you more gain than the SM58... you might want to give it a whirl.

Hi KingBiscuit,

Thanks for the gig report. It's great to hear about how the S1 Pro worked for you in a live performance setting.

KingBiscuit posted:

Yesterday, I played 6 - 9 on the river side deck at a restaurant/bar. The area seats maybe 75. The new owners only book solo acoustic acts and stipulate "Not Loud". 

I used the S1 Pro on a short speaker stand with my Composite Acoustics Legacy in channel 2 and a Shure SM58 in channel 1 Tonematch set accordingly.

The gig went well, the owners liked me, crowd was decent but dropped off after 8.  I had the volume at right where the owner wanted it, which IMO was a little too quiet but they write the check so that's where it stayed.

I ran the S1 on battery for the entire gig and it was fine.  I was right next to an outlet just in case.  The guitar had tons of volume set at 1200 but the SM 58 was barely adequate at 3:00.   If fact, initially, I had the mic maxed and was concerned it wasn't enough.

Perhaps it's to reduce mic feedback but the gain in my mic seems to be very weak.  I tried it on both channels and tried a different SM58, it was the same.

Whether guitar or mic channels 1 and 2 both don't really kick in until you get above 12:00.  I read somewhere the reason behind this somewhere but can't find it now.

We have an article about that.

Microphone vs Guitar Volume

Different Volume Control Levels

Question
Why do I have to turn up the microphone higher than guitar?
Answer
The output level of the guitar is louder than the output level of the microphone. That's why we have to turn up the microphone higher.


In the picture above the

  1. Microphone is connected to channel 1
  2. Guitar is connected to channel 2

The volume on channel 1 (microphone) is higher than on channel 2 (guitar) because the signal from the microphone is lower than from the guitar.

Read the rest of the article here: Microphone vs Guitar Volume





I'll try to get a power supply for my T1 and try running through that.  It might make the Mic/guitar balance a little easier and increase the overall performance of the S1.

Convenience and User Interface
It's more convenient to have the controls in front of you with the T1. Using the T1 Trim controls, you can get the loudness of your guitar and microphone to look the same on the volume controls.

Performance
You can hit solid red on the LED for the microphone channel if you turn up the volume high enough. That's the maximum usable volume for the S1 Pro. Beyond that, the system is clipping (regardless of whether the source is a microphone or a guitar).  Adding a T1 or other device in front of the S1 Pro does not raise the maximum usable volume (performance). You just hit the maximum at a lower setting on the volume control. 



Bottom line, the S1 Pro did the job.  My entire time from car to ready to play was 5 - 10 minutes, the owners were happy and I got paid.

Hard to beat that.

Thanks for taking time to share your story.

ST

Thanks for the feedback.

When the mic channel was maxed out, I was not clipping.  As noted, the guitar was much louder and was not clipping.  This is why I think if I mix the input, I might get a bit more volume out of the S1.

I'll order a power supply and give it a try. My plans for switching from L1 M2 to all S1 pro include a power supply for the mixer so it won't be wasted.

Hi KingBiscuit,

KingBiscuit posted:

Thanks for the feedback.

When the mic channel was maxed out, I was not clipping.  As noted, the guitar was much louder and was not clipping. 

Aha. Just before I replied above I connected an Audix OM 3b to channel 1 of my S1 Pro. Then I cranked up the volume to the max.  Out of habit I used close mic technique and was able to hit the red LED without pushing hard. At that point, the S1 Pro was as loud as I'd ever push it. 

After reading your reply above, I tried everything again but sang softer, and couldn't light up the red LED. Then I backed off the microphone a few inches and again, I couldn't max out the system.



This is why I think if I mix the input, I might get a bit more volume out of the S1.

So yes, if you're singing softer or farther away from the microphone you may get more gain (more performance) using the T1 in front of the S1 Pro. 

Hey, check out the difference using the ToneMatch switch set on Mic and Off using the mic up close (lips brushing the windscreen), and then do that again with the microphone farther away.  The ToneMatch Preset for Mic was designed for close mic technique.



I'll order a power supply and give it a try. My plans for switching from L1 M2 to all S1 pro include a power supply for the mixer so it won't be wasted.

Most of the time I use ToneMatch mixer in front my Bose gear. It means I'm always using the same user interface. But I'm also enticed by the simplicity of the S1 Pro. 

ST

Hi St, 

"if you're singing softer or farther away from the microphone you may get more gain (more performance) using the T1 in front of the S1 Pro. "

"Soft" has never been an adjective used with my vocals.  A while back, a guy asked "do you even need a mic?" LOL   As for being on the mic, I'm always brushing the wind screen.   So, I'm guessing the SM58 is just a low output mic.  I'm not a mic guru, I use SM58s because they are durable, inexpensive and easy to get just about anywhere.  There may be better choices for this situation, I'll have to check it out.

"Hey, check out the difference using the ToneMatch switch set on Mic and Off using the mic up close (lips brushing the windscreen), and then do that again with the microphone farther away.  The ToneMatch Preset for Mic was designed for close mic technique."

I tried switching tone match off, volume was about the same but the tone really suffered. 

"Most of the time I use ToneMatch mixer in front my Bose gear. It means I'm always using the same user interface. But I'm also enticed by the simplicity of the S1 Pro. "

I agree with the ToneMatch mixer.  I think I said in another thread, I really like having the mix and mute capability right at my finger tips.  Last night, I would just turn the S1 Pro off while I took a short break.  In most situations, I'd play some music from my phone while on break but the owner didn't really want  it.  However, if I had wanted to play music, I would have had to turn the mic and guitar channels down or unplug them.  This where a mute on those channels would be a great enhancement along with a master volume. 

I just ordered a power supply for my T1, I'll see how that works once I get it and have some time to play with it.  As you point out, the downside to using the ToneMatch is that it makes the rig just a bit more complicated which takes away from the beauty of the S1. 

I used my S1s for a ton of gigs with either an external mixer or with a phantom powered mic using a Rolls PB224.

I was unpleasantly surprised when I loaned an S1 and a Senn e835 dynamic microphone to some friends.  I plugged in the mic to train them how to use the PA and could barely get what I thought of as a reasonable maximum volume with the fader nearly maxed.  Apparently, the S1 is just not nearly as useful with low output signal sources as everything else I own.  (A trimmer would have been nice!).

I suppose the good news is that since you have to "hit them hard", the 2 mixers I've used have never even gotten close to maxing out channels 1 or 2 on the S1.

Just a quick update to the discussion on low volume from an SM 58. 

I ordered a power supply and received it Thursday.  I set up the S1 and T1 Mixer in my small office/music room.  Once I got the SM58 and Guitar balanced out, I gave it a shot. 

IMO, during this limited test, I'm able to get a lot more volume out of the SM58 using the T1 mixer.  I can get the mic and guitar balanced nicely on the mixer.  I set up the "main out" to be "post master volume".  I was able to get pretty loud without clipping on the S1.  I'll have to take it outside or to a live gig and see how it works.  I think the overall tone of the S1 is quite a bit better but this is probably a result of the other goodies that the T1 brings to the party....chorus, delay, etc.

As you may have read in another post, I have been considering selling my L1 M2 rig.  Yesterday a musician friend called and asked if I would bring my L1 to his gig and do sound for him.  His mixer died unexpectedly and he didn't want to miss this gig.  Since I didn't have anything going, I took the L1 out and set him up in the same venue that I spoke of at the beginning of this thread.  HUGE MISTAKE!  The L1 sounds SOOOOOOOOOOO GOOD that I don't know if I can bring myself to sell it!  I haven't used the L1 in almost a year and it's easy to forget how great these PAs are.  I hate to do it, but I MIGHT have to renege on the deal I made to sell it in May. True, the L1 cuts through the crowd and projects a lot further than the S1 and the L1 disperses a lot wider than the S1....But the TONE...WOW!

My friend had never played through an L1.  He said "Man, this thing spoils you!  I can't believe how good it sounds and how easy it was to be up and running in a matter of minutes."

I'll use the S1 with T1 Mixer at a few more gigs.  Hopefully, the T1 and the associated toys (reverb, compression, chorus, etc) will help give it the rich tone of the L1 in a much smaller box. 

The S1 appears geared more for a monitor or PA it lacks the necessary controls for single players. I had to purchase a volume pedal. I set the appropriate balance with the SM58 and the guitar at the highest volume before distortion kicks in then use the volume pedal for the appropriate volume for the gig, as the audience levels raised I was able to then raise the volume without adjustment and balance of guitar and vocals.  Another words the volume pedal became my master volume. This avoids the tweaking for live audiences as more people pooled in. I think Bose needs to figure out just where this unit belongs, busking, PA, Monitor, or singer song writer. This unit needs desperately a master volume once the mic levels and guitar levels are set.

The S1 appears to have been "designed" primarily for one-person performance situations -- one, portable unit with two channels (vocal/instrument) with long battery life and great sound.

I've found two of them (with an inexpensive 5 channel mixer) to be an excellent substitute for any other PA that I owned (which I've now sold**). 

I've added a couple of inexpensive subwoofers and already had a JBL EON ONE and filled a sports bar last night with great sound using just those items (with a QSC Touchmix16 mixer).

** Bose L1M2, and F1 and 2 QSC 10" systems.

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