L1 Theory

Hi everyone,
I understand this may be a bit of a long shot but is there any released information on the theory of the L1 system (I heard it changes pressure as opposed to pushing air about). It is an idea for part of my technical report on loudspeakers. I would be extremely grateful for any info you are allowed to divulge.
Regards,
James
Original Post
James

Thanks for checking in and your interest.

Have you looked at the FAQ section of our support site yet? Click here for some explanation of the difference between the Cylindrical Radiator(tm) loudspeaker and a conventional speaker.

I'll be happy to answer any specific questions you might have.

Hope that helps

Hilmar
Hi Hilmar,
Thanks for the info, it set me off in the right direction. Do you have any info on the mechanics of the driver (I understand you probably have confidentiality to think about) that you can divulge?
Failing that, specs like power output, SNR, and frequency response etc. would be awesome
Thanks again,
James
James

For frequency response, power rating and some explanation of why publish less specifications then you may be used to please try this link:
http://musiciansupport.bose.com/faq_repair.aspx?jsessionid=#response

We feel, that many of the typical published specifications are more confusing than helpful mostly because they are either poorly defined, have significantly varying measurement techniques, or simply have little relevance for the behavior of the product in a real-world application.

Thus being said, our L1 speaker uses 24 2.5" inch cone drivers with a total power rating of about 500 Watt RMS. The B1 bass module uses 2 6.5" cone drivers with about 125 Watt RMS power rating. A system with 2 bass modules would provide 750 Watts of power.

SNR depends really on how you define it (and what your measurement conditions are). Using our internal process the system measures 104 dB SNR, but how that compares to other manufacturer's numbers depends on how whatever process they are using.

Hope that helps

Hilmar
Hey Hilmar,
Excellent job on the info. I think this is enough to write a section on the L1 in my report. Is an anechoic chamber a room with several foam spikes, I think I might have seen one in Japan. Once again thankyou for the help, and I look forward to buying a bose system in the future if this is hte level of support you get!
Regards,
James
An anechoic chamber is a special test room that has walls generate as little reflections as possible. Usually that's done with deep foam wedges on all size sides.
Here is a picture (off google)


Good luck with your report and let us know if there is anyhting else you need.
I'm curious, what's your report about ?

Hope that helps
Hilmar

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