L1 Model II

Let's talk about the L1® Portable Line Array Systems

Using proprietary Bose® technology, L1 systems combine  PA and monitors into a single, highly portable unit. The  loudspeaker can be positioned behind or to the side —and you hear what the audience hears.

Highly portable PA and monitor combined for solo performers, DJs and general-purpose use. Fixed vertical control with 180° horizontal coverage Reduced vulnerability to feedback.

Three systems to choose from (Compact, Model 1S, Model II)
Two passive bass module options (B1 or B2)
Consistent coverage and tonal balance, portability and easy setup.

Hi Folks

Firstly, Happy New Year fellow Bose users.

I did a fab gig last night in a village hall with around 160 people who kept the dance floor busy all night.

I was using my L1 Model 2 with the B2 and had it set on stage with me about 8-feet back and to the side as shown in the picture below.

The T1 was set as follows:

Channel 1, mic, trim at 1 o'clock and volume at around 12 0'clock.

Channel 2, guitar, trim at 3 o'clock and volume at 2 o'clock.

Channel 4/5, trim at 12 o'clock and volume at 10 o'clock.

The master volume on the T1 was at the 12 o'clock position which is where I usually start and most of the time I seldom have to go past that setting.

Last night being New Years Eve the audience were in party mood and as they became more energetic I started to increase the master volume to around 2 o'clock and this presented some pretty serious feedback issues.

Could this be an EQ issue or was it just that the position of the L1 to mic ratio was at its maximum tolerance level, I'd estimate the distance between mic and column was about 8/9 feet.

After the gig I kept wondering if it would be better at those bigger venues to place the L1 right at the front of the stage and set my S1 as a monitor but if I do this how would I connect the monitor because last time I tried I came from the master out on the T1 and it cut the main PA out!

Do I come from the AUX and if so how do I route the signal from all channels to the AUX to give me a monitor mix without affecting Front of House?

Cheers guys

Geoff

 

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Look up the polar pattern in your mic, check which areas are rejected.

i did a nye gig with me standing parallel to my L1 B2 T4 and able to rich it with my right hand. I was T 12&12 for trim and volume on mic 1 and 50% in menu volume and 12 on master volume. Had maybe 3 instances of feedback all night.

Compare your mix polar pattern with that of the Shure beta 87A, see how it compares.

Geoff if you do use the S1 as a monitor via the T1 you should use the Aux out not Main. There are some configurations you can do with the Aux that I’d check into the T1 manual for more details. 

What mic are you using with the L1? What polar pattern? We’ve been using Shure Beta 58s and rarely have feedback issues. But they’re dynamic mics with a very tight cardioid pattern.

Hi guys

Thanks for getting back to me.

I should have described what mic I am using. Last night I was using my Rode Performer wireless which is a condenser mic.

I hadn't thought about polar pattern but it sure is worth checking.

Is this something I can compensate for in the T1 or do I need to think about replacing the mic?

On the subject of the T1, do I need to make adjustments in the menu?

I haven't actually done anything with it, I am using the factory default with just a touch of delay on the guitar channel for the Shadows stuff.

Geoff

Geoff I would look into making adjustments with the T1. There’s a wealth of things you can do with it in various menus that take some time investigating but worth the effort. Do a search on this website as there are a lot of resources that have been included on this topic.

Condenser mics are great sounding, but when you get into noisy environments that require cranking volume up, that’s where going with dynamic mics that have a more focused pickup pattern might be a better route. Does your condenser mic require phantom power? Advantages of dynamic mics is they don’t require phantom power and they are can better withstand rough treatment on the road.

There are a myriad of choices in the dynamic mic arena, but we just stuck with the mainstay Shure SM 58 family. Also, you can find used ones for reasonable prices. You might consider having both. Use the condenser mic for certain quieter venues and switch to dynamic mic for other situations. Take a look at the presets that the T1 offers for mic choices too for a starting point.

The slightly more expensive Beta series have a bit more presence than the plain 58s to my ear. Just a bit clearer sound, less muddled. We started with 58’s, then graduated later to the Beta series. They’ve worked flawlessly for us for years. We kept our old 58’s as backups. There are numerous other brands, though, that you could try out to see which one fits your voice the best. 

I'm assuming I understand the question, about "menu" and apologize if I'm telling you something you already know, but Yes, set the T1 up for your mic and guitar and whatever is going in 4/5 if that was the question, that can cause feedback. If there isn't a preset for your stuff, experiment and find the best one. E.G. My Taylor guitar screams with bass feedback using the Taylor presets, go figure,  so I use one designed for a different guitar and it's fine. Maybe play with the gain staging also beginning with the trim knobs on top (dial them back a bit), then bottom (dial it up) and Master. 

The Aux out is defined in preferences on the main dial. You select which channels to the to aux out with or without effects. 

Hi Geoff,

That's a terrific picture.

Geoff posted:

Hi Folks

Firstly, Happy New Year fellow Bose users.

I did a fab gig last night in a village hall with around 160 people who kept the dance floor busy all night.

I was using my L1 Model 2 with the B2 and had it set on stage with me about 8-feet back and to the side as shown in the picture below.

The T1 was set as follows:

Channel 1, mic, trim at 1 o'clock and volume at around 12 0'clock.

Is this your microphone? TX-M2
Cardioid polar pattern

Or the S1
Super-Cardioid polar pattern



Channel 2, guitar, trim at 3 o'clock and volume at 2 o'clock.

Channel 4/5, trim at 12 o'clock and volume at 10 o'clock.

Here's a video about setting up the gain staging (set the trims).

The principles are the same for your guitar and whatever you are running into channel 4/5.



The master volume on the T1 was at the 12 o'clock position which is where I usually start and most of the time I seldom have to go past that setting.

Last night being New Years Eve the audience were in party mood and as they became more energetic I started to increase the master volume to around 2 o'clock and this presented some pretty serious feedback issues.

Could this be an EQ issue or was it just that the position of the L1 to mic ratio was at its maximum tolerance level, I'd estimate the distance between mic and column was about 8/9 feet.

After the gig I kept wondering if it would be better at those bigger venues to place the L1 right at the front of the stage and set my S1 as a monitor but if I do this how would I connect the monitor because last time I tried I came from the master out on the T1 and it cut the main PA out!

There's no reason this should have happened. Try it again and see if you have the same issue.



Do I come from the AUX and if so how do I route the signal from all channels to the AUX to give me a monitor mix without affecting Front of House?

See:

T1 ToneMatch® Audio Engine Aux Output
--∈∞ΘΞ Please click the picture for more details ΞΘ∞∋--    





Cheers guys

Geoff

Here's an article that covers all the things you can do with the T1 to deal with feedback.

Microphone Feedback

Does that help?

ST

Hi John,

My personal favorite microphone is a Neuman KMS 105. I've been using it for over ten years in all kinds of situations with my L1 systems.

I have had excellent results with the Rode S1 and Shure KSM9 too. All three are hand-held condenser microphones designed for live music. 

Not all condenser microphones are created equal. I've run into some that were very difficult to use on a hot stage. 

The ToneMatch mixers have great tools to help manage feedback in loud environments. You can read about them in Microphone Feedback.

ST

Thanks for all the info guys, I am now pretty certain that changing to a dynamic mic would be the sensible route when I'm doing a more noisy gig.

I do actually have an old SM58 which I always have in my kit bag as a spare.

I also have an SM7B which I use in my studio, it's quite a cumbersome beast and I have never used it for a live gig but I do love it's warmth in the studio so I am tempted to give it a go at a live gig. 

In reply to ST's question, yes my wireless is the TX-M2 which I only use for certain gigs, my main live mic is the Rode M2 which is also a condenser but it does seem to have a more tolerant feedback threshold.

I see the comments about the Beta 87A and understand this is also a condenser mic so surely it would present the same feedback issues at a noisy gig?

I have been looking at the KMS 105 for some time and wonder whether it might be a good investment but as a condenser does it not present similar feedback issues when relatively close to the system?

Always grateful for any tips guys.

Once again, many thanks.

Geoff

Hi Geoff,

I've had problems with the Shure Beta 87A. I've found it to be more prone to high end feedback than the Neumann KMS 105. 

What microphone were you using last night? The Rode M2 or something else?

Please see the article Microphone Feedback and particularly the section on Close Microphone Technique

Microphone technique is one of the most important factors when it comes to gain-before-feedback (regardless of microphone technology - dynamic or condenser).

ST

Hi ST

I was using my Rode Performer wireless mic. It was fine during the first half of the evening but as people started getting more energetic I cranked things up a bit and that's when the feedback problems started.

I understand the comments about the dynamic v condenser mic for the noisier gigs and I have to confess that it is something I totally overlooked.

I have ordered a KMS 105 which is due for delivery tomorrow (Friday) and although it's a condenser I have seen quite a few reviews that suggests it is more tolerant to feedback than my wireless mic.

I have been thinking about a KMS for some time to be honest and this more or less just helped me make that decision.

It isn't a knee-jerk purchase because of the New Year issues, I accept that there will come times when even a dynamic mic will feedback depending on the venue and mic-to-speaker ratio.

I bought the 105 because I need a mic which is capable of showcasing the dynamics in my voice and the 105 just seems to fit the bill.

Apart from that a good friend of mine who is a recording engineer swears by them and actually suggested it would be the perfect mic for my style of singing (traditional American country, classic Rock & Roll, 60's and ballads).

I understand there is a KMS 105 preset in the T1 so am I right in thinking that if I select that the EQ will already be set according to the mic or do I still need to look at the gain settings?

Geoff

 

Hi Geoff,

Geoff posted:
✄ - ✂ - ✄ - ✂ - ✄ - ✂ - ✄ - ✂ - ✄

I understand there is a KMS 105 preset in the T1 so am I right in thinking that if I select that the EQ will already be set according to the mic or do I still need to look at the gain settings?

Geoff

There is a ToneMatch Preset for the Neumann KMS 105. This will give you EQ settings that are optimized for using this microphone using Close Microphone Technique (lips barely brushing the windscreen).

Yes, you will still need to do the gain staging (set the trim) as shown in the video below.

Note: Close Microphone Technique is a key factor in getting maximum gain-before-feedback.

Depending on the timbre of your voice, you may need to take a little off the low end with the zEQ. I roll off -3dB. I doubt you'll need to do anything with the Parametric EQ.

Enjoy the KMS 105.

ST

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