L1 Model II

Let's talk about the L1® Portable Line Array Systems

Using proprietary Bose® technology, L1 systems combine  PA and monitors into a single, highly portable unit. The  loudspeaker can be positioned behind or to the side —and you hear what the audience hears.

Highly portable PA and monitor combined for solo performers, DJs and general-purpose use. Fixed vertical control with 180° horizontal coverage Reduced vulnerability to feedback.

Three systems to choose from (Compact, Model 1S, Model II)
Two passive bass module options (B1 or B2)
Consistent coverage and tonal balance, portability and easy setup.

L1® Compact - What vocal microphone are you using?

The Compact is in interesting creation and as it was with the Classic, and the Model II with T1®, it is a reason to go and revisit old ideas.

In my case, this was to think about vocal microphones. I was looking for a simple dynamic microphone - something easy.

If you get the L1® Compact Accessory Pack it includes an Audix OM3 microphone.

I don't have one of those here so I went through my dynamic microphones to see what might work.

I was surprised to find that an old EV N/D 408 works really well.

--== click the picture to see it in context ==--

I am not recommending that you go out of your way to find one of these microphones. It has been replaced by the EV N/D 468 A. AND - this is not a vocal microphone. It is often used on a snare drum. But with the Compact it sounds good anyway. So if you have one kicking around give it a shot.

It is a supercardioid dynamic microphone. It is a little prone to plosive pops, but if you get right up on the windscreen that all disappears. Then, when you are right on top of it, this microphone sounds huge. It has a big proximity effect so I rolled off some of the bass.

I have to keep the Compact Channel 1 volume below 12:00 o'clock or else the vocal completely overpowers the Guitar in Channel 2.

What microphones have you tried and liked with your Compact?


Here are some notes about the microphone in case you are interested.



EV N/D 408


Supercardioid Dynamic,
Instrument Microphone N/D 408A

The Electro-Voice N/D408A is a supercardioid dynamic microphone utilizing a revolutionary neodymium alloy to form the EV-exclusive N/DYM magnet with four times the power potention of conventional microphone magnets. With a computer-optimized design, the N/DYM magnetic strucuture is maximized in the N/D408A to provide 6 dB more output sensitivity over conventional designs while the more uniform magnetic field lowers distortion during peak sound pressure levels.

The large diaphram contains 50 percent more surface area than conventional designs and is reinforced to prevent "breakup." The result is an extended high-frequency response with an open, transparent sound quality.

The exceptional sensitivity of the N/D408A combined with the inherently low noise of a dynamic transducer insures a superior signal-to-noise ratio ready for digital recording and sampling. To further reduce noise, a highly effective hum-bucking coil is used to cancel hum from lighting and other sources.

N/DYM Series II microphones feature DynaDamp, and Advanced vibration-isolation material. DynaDamp is a unique foamed elastomer, specifically formulated for vibration control. DynaDamp forms and advanced-technology vibration-isolation system which dramatically reduces all forms of vibration transmitted noise for the most demanding situations.

The N/DYM Series II pop filter incorporated a special molded retainer which insures optimum placement of the Acoustiform filter material, for maximum rejection of both wind noise and vocal P-pops. The retainer makes the pop filter an integral part of the microphone's removable upper grille assembly, allowing easy cleaning for continuted top performance.

The uniform supercardioid polar pattern of the N/D408A insures superior gain-before-feedback in live applications and better isolation in the studio-at all frequencies-comparied with other directional microphones with widely varying polar characteristics.

The N/D408A represents a radical departure from conventional instrument microphone designs. The unique pivoting yoke configuration allows maximum flexibility in positioning the microphone near a sound source.

The low frequency response of the N/D408A can be extended by positioning the microphone closer to the sound source as documented in the specification section. This proximity effect occurs when the microphone is placed within 12 inches of the sound source and increases as the working distance is reduced. The low frequency response is tailored to provide bass boost without the "boominess" of many directional microphones. Thus, closer working distances can be used with N/D408A to reduce the risk of sound system feedback (ringing) while preserving instrument tonality.

The dynamic element of the N/D408A will provide reliable operation in humidity and temperature extremes-adverse conditions that would render condenser microphones useless. For years of trouble free operation "on the road," the N/D408A utilizes an all metal core construction, from the hardened windscreen to the yoke mounting system.

N/D 408A Specifications

Polar Pattern: Equivalent Output Noise
Supercardioid 14 dB (0 dB=0.0002 dyne/cm)
Frequency reponse: Impedance
Close: 30...22000 Hz; Far: 60..22000 Hz 150 ohms balanced
Open circuit output level Microphone Dimentions:
3.1 mV/Pa at 1000 Hz 4.55 x 2.8 5x 2.75 inches
Power Sensitivity Weight:
-51 dB (0 dB=1mW/10 dynes/cm) 6.7 ounces190g
Dynamic Range
144 dB




Really big bottom on this guy.

Attachments

Photos (3)
Original Post
Well, I also have used my Beyerdynamic M 88


It's a hypercardioid dynamic microphone. I find it works really well with the T1® or Model I with the appropriate ToneMatch® Preset. It is a little bottomy for me with the Compact unless I back off to about 2-3". This is hard for me to do when I have worked at getting used to working closer.

This is a fabulous microphone for female vocals on the Compact though.

Here's another microphone you just wouldn't expect to work.


A Sony C48 - an oldie, long discontinued. It is a large diaphragm condenser microphone that can run off an internal 9 volt battery or phantom power. Since it can run without phantom power I tried it over several days.

If I put the Compact slightly ahead of me, and I set the polar pattern to Cardioid or bidirectional (figure 8), it sounds terrific.


This microphone is NOT intended for close-microphone technique so gain before feedback is an issue. It is intended for recording rather than live sound so it will feedback if I get the volume too high. I think it would be fine in quiet concert situation up to perhaps 1000 square feet (40 x 25). I've run it in a space larger than this, but I think this is a reasonable and conservative estimate.

This microphone has a really sweet retro vibe to it. Lots of fun.



Here are the specificatinos.

quote:

Product Information
The Sony C 48 is a large diaphragm, multi-pattern condenser microphone designed for vocal and general instrument recording and sound reinforcement. The C 48 features 3 selectable polar-patterns. Cardioid, omni-directional and bi-directional (figure eight) patterns provide the flexibility needed for any recording application. The C 48 is powered via +48 volt phantom or 9 Volt DC alkaline battery. The capsule is securely housed in a vibration proof enclosure eliminating noise caused by handling. A 10dB Pad switch improves Sound Pressure Level handling. A 2 position low-frequency roll-off switch reduces hum and noise registered at lower frequencies.

Product MPN
MPN c48

Key Features
Types Quantity Single Microphone Type
Type Condenser
Connectivity Cable
Usage Professional
Professional Compatibility Recording

Technical Features
Polarity Bidirectional, Omnidirectional, Unidirectional
Frequency Response 30 - 16000 Hz
Impedance 150 ohms

Plug
Plug Type XLR

Dimensions
Weight 19.4 oz.
quote:
Neumann KMS 105


Can we also mention if the mic you're using/testing is without a T1: using the built-in Tonematch on the Compact.

I always used a Neumann KMS 105 with my L1 Classic, but its a condenser. Just wondering what works best straight into the Compact (for male vocal, high tenor)

Thinking perhaps a Shure 57, as ST mentions...
Hi John,

quote:
Neumann KMS 105



Sorry, I could have been clearer about that.

When I use the KMS 105 I use an in-line phantom power supply.

I am so accustomed to singing with this microphone - just in terms of how I work with it's tight polar pattern and slight proximity effect, that I don't mind that very little bother for me to use the phantom power supply.

Does that help?
quote:
Originally posted by John Baker:

Can we also mention if the mic you're using/testing is without a T1: using the built-in Tonematch on the Compact.

I always used a Neumann KMS 105 with my L1 Classic, but its a condenser. Just wondering what works best straight into the Compact (for male vocal, high tenor)

Thinking perhaps a Shure 57, as ST mentions...
I have tried several different dynamics, but have settled on the Audix OM5. I have found that I can make many different mics work for me as far as tone is concerned, but the hypercardioid mics offer the feedback rejection that gives me one less thing to be concerned about at gig time.

I think the fact that Bose offers the OM3 as a package with the Compact, should not go unnoticed by those who have questions about what mic to chose for use with the Compact.

O..
I just picked up an Audix OM2 and I was very pleasantly surprised at how well it worked with the Compact.


quote:
Audix OM2
Vocal & instrument mic, full, clear sound with slight bass proximity, for small to mid-size PA systems

Designed, assembled and tested by Audix in the USA, the OM2 is a dynamic vocal microphone used for a wide variety of live and studio applications. The OM2 is known for its clear and accurate sound reproduction, resistance to feedback and ability to handle very high sound pressure levels without distortion.

The OM2 is characterized with a tight and uniformly controlled hypercardioid polar pattern which helps to isolate the vocals from the rest of the instruments on stage. With a wide frequency range of 50 Hz - 16 kHz, the OM2 employs a VLM™ (Very Low Mass) diaphragm for natural sound with exceptional transient response.

The OM2 is designed with slight bass proximity and a tailored mid-range, giving it a full bodied sound on small to mid-size PA systems. The OM2 is well balanced, comfortable to hold, durable and manufactured with high standards and tight tolerances.

Roadworthy construction includes a precision die cast zinc alloy body, black e-coat finish, laser etched model and serial number, steel mesh grill, Switchcraft® XLR connector and heavy duty nylon clip.

Audix OM2
quote:
Originally posted by ST:
Hi nungten,

Thank you for joining the Forum.

Using a standard XLR-XLR microphone cable I run from the CM-311A belt-pack to Compact channel 1.

Does this answer your question?



Hi ST,
THANKYOU! for your very clear reply.

i am checking out options for microphones as i would like to buy the Compact but i am new at all this so kindly help:
i like the CM311A for it's noise cancellation feature, but i find it bulky and am not so happy with the color. can you recommend a similar mic which is sleeker, lighter and also available in skin tone color ?

Also what do you think of the sennheiser HSP4 ? would it be matched with the Compact ?

Thanks !
Hi nungten,

You are welcome.

I looked at the Sennheiser HSP4 and at a glance it seems only slightly less visually obtrusive than the Crown CM-311A. My guess is that it would feel very similar (bulky?).

As for the appearance, (colour, bulkiness) I think that how much this matters depends a great deal on the distance the performer/talker/singer is from the audience, and the nature of the performance.

So here are some questions for you:

What kind of performances are you doing? Please describe the types of events where you would be using the Compact with a head worn microphone.

How far is the performer from the audience? What is s/he doing? (walking around, standing at a podium, dancing?)

How far is the performer going to be from the Compact (in feet or metres).



What will the audience be doing during the performance (listening intently, talking to each other, ... ?)

No matter what the application is, you would probably be well served by getting a directional microphone: (super cardioid, hyper cardioid, or cardioid).
quote:
Originally posted by ST:
Hi nungten,

You are welcome.

I looked at the Sennheiser HSP4 and at a glance it seems only slightly less visually obtrusive than the Crown CM-311A. My guess is that it would feel very similar (bulky?).

As for the appearance, (colour, bulkiness) I think that how much this matters depends a great deal on the distance the performer/talker/singer is from the audience, and the nature of the performance.

So here are some questions for you:

What kind of performances are you doing? Please describe the types of events where you would be using the Compact with a head worn microphone.

How far is the performer from the audience? What is s/he doing? (walking around, standing at a podium, dancing?)

How far is the performer going to be from the Compact (in feet or metres).



What will the audience be doing during the performance (listening intently, talking to each other, ... ?)

No matter what the application is, you would probably be well served by getting a directional microphone: (super cardioid, hyper cardioid, or cardioid).


Hi ST,
Thanks! for your reply.
i feel that the Sennheiser HSP4 is sleeker and weighs ten times less but besides that, i still haven't understood if it is technically compatible with the Compact.

FYI the Compact would be used for performance (acoustic gui/voc) in intimate sized venues with the performer sitting and the audience listening intently. the stage areas are small so the performer would be about four feet or so from the Compact. more important is the need to amplify the very subtle qualities of the singer's voice hence the interest in a head worn differoid microphone.

i have checked out hand held mic options also and find good reviews of the AudixOM7. what is your opinion ?
Thanks !
Hi nungten,

Thank you for this great information.
quote:
Originally posted by nungten:
Hi ST,
Thanks! for your reply.
i feel that the Sennheiser HSP4 is sleeker and weighs ten times less but besides that, i still haven't understood if it is technically compatible with the Compact.
quote:


From what I can read in the specifications, the CM-311A is 61 grams (without the battery pack) and the Sennheiser HSP4 is 9.2 grams.

PLEASE NOTE: The Compact microphone input does not supply phantom power (as is required by the Sennheiser HSP4). This means that you will need to use phantom power supply or external mixer with phantom power.

The Crown has it's own phantom power supply built into the belt-pack.


FYI the Compact would be used for performance (acoustic gui/voc) in intimate sized venues with the performer sitting and the audience listening intently. the stage areas are small so the performer would be about four feet or so from the Compact. more important is the need to amplify the very subtle qualities of the singer's voice hence the interest in a head worn differoid microphone.

It can take a little while to learn how to use a head worn microphone effectively. You can not easily vary the distance from the microphone so you have to be able to stay on pitch and maintain tonal quality throughout the vocal range while at the same time managing volume.

quote:

i have checked out hand held mic options also and find good reviews of the AudixOM7. what is your opinion ?
Thanks !


The Audix OM7 gets good reviews and I know someone who uses it as his main microphone all the time. Please note - this microphone is optimized for situations with very high ambient noise (stage volumes).

"Designed, assembled and tested by Audix in the USA, the OM7 is a dynamic vocal microphone used for professional sound companies, front of house and mixing engineers, and high profile fixed installations. The OM7 is known for its ability to provide unprecedented gain before feedback on concert level stages without sacrificing sound quality. In addition, the OM7 is very resistant to feedback on extremely loud stages, and for performers who tend to “cup” the microphone with both hands.

In order to achieve these extraordinary performance benefits, the OM7 is designed with an unconventionally low output level (8-10 dB lower than typical dynamic microphones). This low gain stage acts as a natural “pad” at the capsule in order to maintain high fidelity at the source. For this reason, the OM7 is best suited for use with high quality mixing consoles with plenty of head room to compensate for the low gain.

The OM7 is characterized with a super-tight hypercardioid polar pattern which effectively isolates the vocals from the rest of the instruments on stage. With a wide frequency range of 48 Hz - 19 kHz, the OM7 employs a VLM™ (Very Low Mass) diaphragm for a very clean and punchy sound with exceptional transient response."

Source — http://www.audixusa.com/docs/products/OM7.shtml

You may be paying a premium for features that you don't need.

You might be better served by an OM5 or OM6.

Back to general notes:

You should be able to use any quality microphone that is intended for live sound reinforcement for vocals. The Compact does not provide phantom power, so dynamic microphones (that require no phantom power)... dynamic microphones will be simplest to set up. But if you use a T1 ToneMatch® Audio Engine (or other device that provides phantom power) then you have a world of choices.


If you already have the Crown CM-311A, I'd encourage you to use that with the Compact, at least initially. Then if you find the bulkiness and the colour obtrusive, then explore your other options. At least for me, the Crown CM-311A is a good sounding microphone and the tight polar pattern is a good match for the Compact and for isolation from the acoustic guitar.

I like to use head worn microphones for some shows and I prefer my hand-held microphones on a stand for others, but in your case, if you already have the Crown, then I wouldn't be rushing out to get other microphones. I'd get the Compact because it sounds like a perfect fit for your performance situation, and then explore other options later.

Does that help?
quote:
Originally posted by ST:
Hi again nungten,

Here is another discussion that you might find interesting:

Stepping out from behind the microphone stand


Hi ST,
Thanks! for your reply and also the link to the discussion on vocal mics. it's a whole new universe out there, i am overwhelmed!
i am going to take my time to check it all out - i don't have the crown311A - before i make my decision. i must confess, i am drawn to the countrymanE6i for it's size and color but i know your advice for the simplest setup is the best option, to begin with.
Thanks once again for all your help.
i'll be back!
Smile
Hello gang,

I am currently auditioning a beautiful KMS 105 with the L1 compact (Run through a T1, with the KMS 105 preset and all EQ settings set to flat).

(This I supposed to be an upgrade to my old Audix OM-6, which was starting to feel edgy with the L1). I also use a Shure Super 55 deluxe for gigs when I want a retro look

The sound (for my baritone voice) of the KMS 105 is very smooth and even. Very "pro" compared to my Audix, and Super 55. Though not particularly present when I wanted it to be. I also found it to be very, very "boomy" when I would come into it too close. Or sang low. Can anyone suggest a remedy to this?

Am also going to sample a shure Beta 87a..

Thanks - Mike
Hi Big Mike,

Learn not to come in too close. It's like anything else, you can learn this.

Also see if you can figure out the frequencies where the problem is most evident. This is actually pretty easy if you use the T1® tuner. Sing the note and read the frequency.

Once you know the frequency you can use the ParaEQ to reduce that frequency.

ParaEQ to solve problems

I have found the Beta 87A more prone to feedback. I had to be much more careful about where I pointed it.
ST, I can imagine that you are getting tired of hearing from me, but I just don't know much about what I'm writing about, plus I've got Medicare-type abilities with technology. As you might recall, I play small venues from a sitting position, and I want to use a single mic for both vocal and banjo/guitar (no pickups here). First, assuming I decide on a mic, which channel do I plug it into, since it will be used for both vocal and instrument? Second, if I decide to go with a large diaphragm dynamic mic, how far away from my banjo and mouth can I set the mic so it will pick up both reasonably well? Third, will a large diaphragm mic work better or more or less as well as a condenser. Thanks again for putting up with the questions. I keep looking for info, and I keep running into more of your topics on Google.

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