L1 Model II

Let's talk about the L1® Portable Line Array Systems

Using proprietary Bose® technology, L1 systems combine  PA and monitors into a single, highly portable unit. The  loudspeaker can be positioned behind or to the side —and you hear what the audience hears.

Highly portable PA and monitor combined for solo performers, DJs and general-purpose use. Fixed vertical control with 180° horizontal coverage Reduced vulnerability to feedback.

Three systems to choose from (Compact, Model 1S, Model II)
Two passive bass module options (B1 or B2)
Consistent coverage and tonal balance, portability and easy setup.

Help us understand zEQ

There's SO much being discussed about the Model II that I'm overloaded...can't keep up. So maybe this got asked/answered already. If so, I apologize for wasting bandwidth.

If not, though, it deserves its own topic.

I'm not entirely clear on what zEQ actually is. The language surrounding it suggests that it's actually adaptive and adjusts itself to the frequency range of the input signal.

Or, it might just be a tweak of the EQ center points, programmed in at the time of preset creation, so that the center points match the intended use of the preset.

What's the deal?

Thanks...
Original Post
Hi Andrew,

I think you've got it here:
quote:

Or, it might just be a tweak of the EQ center points, programmed in at the time of preset creation, so that the center points match the intended use of the preset.

But I don't think of this a 'just' anything, except 'just brilliant'.



I'm sure we'll get some more info from the people-at-Bose, but in the meantime:

From the Online version of the T1 ToneMatch&trade: audio engine Manual

quote:


p 25:
zEQ
Provides instrument-specific
Low/Mid/High tone controls.

Shaping the tone of an instrument
Based on the ToneMatch preset, the zEQ function allows you to cut or boost the Low/
Mid/High frequency bands from +15 dB to –15dB.




and from the T1 ToneMatch™ audio engine page
quote:

zEQ

Proprietary zEQ tone controls let you make further adjustments after selecting your ToneMatch preset. Ordinary tone controls are generic by design, with "High," "Mid," and "Low" controls spread out across the entire musical spectrum. But with the touch of a button, Bose zEQ automatically shifts the range of these controls to correspond directly to the range of your instrument. This innovative technology gives you more precise tone control, so it's easier to fine-tune your sound.
quote:
But with the touch of a button, Bose zEQ automatically shifts the range of these controls to correspond directly to the range of your instrument.


That's the passage. This sentence implies that zEQ is some sort of active circuit (i.e., it "automatically shifts" the range of the controls), as opposed to being a predefined set of new center points associated with the preset.
Hi Andrew,

I think that the press of the button shifts the points, not in response to the input, but to some pre-determined points that are instrument appropriate. Since the presets are instrument-specific I thought that your idea that these would be tied to the presets made sense.

I'm sure the guys-at-Bose will help us get through this.
Hi Andrew and Earthworm,

ST's got it right.

Here's another way to think about it.

By selecting a ToneMatch™ preset, you're telling the T1 something about what you play or that you sing.

Once you do that, zEQ tone controls are automatically programmed to give you the three most useful tonal enhancements for that instrument or for the voice. We found these three top sensitive tonal ranges by listening.

So, for example, if you select a ToneMatch preset for an electric bass, the three tone controls are automatically programmed to provide the three most useful tonal enhancements we could find for the bass guitar.

This is profound. Think about the choices before: you'd have fixed-frequency and fixed-Q tone controls on a mixer that often didn't line up at all with what you wanted to boost or cut, or you'd have tone controls with variable frequency and Q that most people haven't a clue how to optimize.

We thought we could do all the work for you. WE took the time to explore the best center frequencies and the best Q values and custom designed three filters for each ToneMatch preset that tie to the instrument or voice.

Grab any of the three tone controls and they all do something useful.

Isn't that NEAT?

Ken
Or even more simply put, you tell it you're playing a guitar, the tone controls (bass, mid, treble) are more focused on the frequency range of THAT INSTRUMENT. Plug in a bass and tell it "Bass guitar" and the bass/mid/treble controls act differently and boost/cut a smaller range of frequencies that are tailored to a bass guitar.

Instead of 20Hz-20kHz as the range for bass/mid/treble, it is suited to your instrument (a bass, for instance, might only cover 30Hz to 1000Hz and that's it).
Hi Andrew, Earthworm, ST,
Just passing through: ST is right. zEQ automatically shifts the tone control center frequencies in response to the preset setting, at the time you choose the preset. zEQ "comes with the preset", invisibly.

Example: Suppose you are a singing bass player (imagine that!). You put your mic into Input 1 and choose a vocal mic preset there, and then you put your instrument into Input 2 and choose a bass guitar preset there. Now you boost the treble on your vocal channel and notice that your voice gets brighter and has stronger sibilants. Next you boost the treble on your instrument and notice that you get more snap and harmonics. The frequency ranges boosted by the two treble controls are different and are appropriate to the ranges of the instruments designated by the presets. Automagically, no secret menu tweaking, no user serviceable parts inside. You don't have to ask for it, you just get it, every time.
How about that?
Chris
And for the techno-geeks:

We optimize not only the frequencies but also the exact shape of the tone controls. There is fairly large possible set of control shapes (notches and peaks with different widths, shelves with different steepness, spectral tilts, etc.) and we (or to be more precise Mike-Z and Cliff) have spend countless hours experimenting to find the best fit for each instrument.

The T1 supports individual zEQ settings for each preset. Although most acoustic guitar presets use the same zEQ, every now and then we find a particular model zEQ that works better with a different zEQ and we incorporate that into the specific preset for that model. Again, that's an example of "the more we know about your instrument, the better we can help you making it sound good".


Hope that helps

Hilmar
Thanks Guys-at-Bose! That was very helpful. I'm excited to get the new system. This is pretty exciting technology.

As I've said before, very few times in my life has a product lived up to its marketing. The Bose system goes way beyond its marketing. I am still amazed by my L1 Classic at every gig (last night for example--it sounded really good). People notice.
This is really interesting...especially Hilmar's stuff about how the zEQ involves much more than just adjusting the frequency centers for the tone controls.

It also changes the way some of us look at the whole issue of plugging into the system. I'm a BassPOD user and use preset 00, relying on the POD to give me my tone. I can still do that, of course, but I may need to rethink everything given all the processing built into the T1.

Depending on the sound I get out of the T1 presets, I suppose the tone-shaping part of the POD could be bypassed and I'd just use it as a multi-effects unit.

Speaking of bass tone....hey, Cliff...I know you're ultra-busy, but my Bongo and I are still available at your convenience for some preset creation goodness.
quote:

It also changes the way some of us look at the whole issue of plugging into the system. I'm a BassPOD user and use preset 00, relying on the POD to give me my tone. I can still do that, of course, but I may need to rethink everything given all the processing built into the T1.

Depending on the sound I get out of the T1 presets, I suppose the tone-shaping part of the POD could be bypassed and I'd just use it as a multi-effects unit.


Andy,

You're covered :-) There's a preset in the T1(tm) that is 'Flat' like 00, but has the zEQ controls for the bass - so you have the benefits of the BassPOD and zEQ.

This is true for every instrument category as well. There is a 'Flat' preset with that categories most common zEQ controls.

-MikeZ
quote:
Originally posted by NetTek:
Would you guys knock it off!!! Every time I think I've rationalized not upgrading My "Classic", you go and explain in detail some reason why I absolutely have to have this thing!!!

I hate you!!!


I've never enjoyed being hated so much. Don't forget, this is the T1 Tone Match Module we're talking about. It can be used with the L1 "Classic".

How do you like us now??? Wink
WOW! the T1 has me foaming at the mouth! Does anyone realize how much audio power there is in that little box? This is so exciting for me to think that I won't have to carry around any external processors. The T1 takes the place of so much equipment. With the zEQ in combination with the Para EQ I should be able to dial in anything I want. And multiple memories to boot! Nice touch Bose!
Two questions about the T1:

- If one previously used a Baggs Para-DI both to shape acoustic guitar tone but even moreso to get the additional gain from its XLR output - can we expect the T1 to accomplish both of those? The tone EQ I anticipate, but I don't see how the XLR gain gets done.

- In using the T1 with the Classic L1 - connecting it via a standard quarter-inch cable (into CH 3) - that really WORKS? I can't imagine HOW 3 XLR channels and 4/5 could go through a 1/4 without losing gain and tone. I certainly admit I'm not very technical and not an electrical engineer, but... huh?

Also - I'm truly NOT being negative, pessimistic or critical - just CURIOUS. And I really want this to work! Im's sure it will, but how?!

Thanks, Mike
Mike,

The preamps in the T1 don't sound like they have any more gain than the preamps in the Classic - anyone at-Bose correct me if this is wrong - so if you don't have enough gain with the Classic presets you may still need the Para DI. Part of the reason of using the DI & having the balanced out (XLR) is for longer cable runs. If you have the T1 on your mic stand you can use a shorter 1/4" cable (if you don't move around the stage too much).

With some pickups the high impedance of the input on the Bose preamp still may not be as smooth as the even-higher impedance of an acoustic preamp like the Para DI.
Hi:
quote:
In using the T1 with the Classic L1 - connecting it via a standard quarter-inch cable (into CH 3) - that really WORKS? I can't imagine HOW 3 XLR channels and 4/5 could go through a 1/4 without losing gain and tone. I certainly admit I'm not very technical and not an electrical engineer, but... huh?

I'm sort of in the same boat as you on this but, because of recent, and ongoing, advances in technology, I'm confident that I'll plug into a T1 and be just as stunned as I was when I plugged into my L1 Classic for the first time.

Look at this piece of technology:
Digital Snake...
All those signals coming back to the mixer via one cable connection!
There was a time when I'd have said "no way you can do this and still have quality sound coming out of the speakers". Now, I'm convinced most anything is possible given time, and an open mind.

Stu
Hi Mike, Hi Stu

quote:

- In using the T1 with the Classic L1 - connecting it via a standard quarter-inch cable (into CH 3) - that really WORKS? I can't imagine HOW 3 XLR channels and 4/5 could go through a 1/4 without losing gain and tone. I certainly admit I'm not very technical and not an electrical engineer, but... huh?


First, I see the T1 ToneMatch™ audio engine as much more than a simple mixer with effects. But for this discussion point let's say that, that is all it is.

Next, if someone said that a small mixer with effects (3 mic preamps and two line-level inputs) and output to a single line level output that would sound like a fairly typical mini mixer.

So I can accept that this (T1 to PS1 Powerstand: Channel 3 or 4) should work fine. I've done it many times with small mixers (in a pinch).

Does that work for you?

PS - Stu, the digital snake in your linked page looks like it is also using a cat-5 ethercon (same as the connection between the T1 and the L1™ Model II power stand)..
quote:
Originally posted by MikeZ-at-Bose:
Andy,

You're covered :-) There's a preset in the T1(tm) that is 'Flat' like 00, but has the zEQ controls for the bass - so you have the benefits of the BassPOD and zEQ.

This is true for every instrument category as well. There is a 'Flat' preset with that categories most common zEQ controls.

-MikeZ


Eek Eek Eek Eek

This thing is getting cooler by the minute!

My biggest challenge at the moment is explaining to people just how cool it is without getting all propeller-head-geeky about it.

I think the thing that might resonate best is explaining how all of the EQ, effects and presets are available on each channel...INDIVIDUALLY. It's like getting four separate racks full of gear for five hundred bucks!

My only wish (not a complaint...I think the T1 is incredible and kudos to you guys for doing such a great job) is that it had a footswitch. I mean, I need chorus from time to time, but not ALL the time. So the built-in effects are less useful than they might otherwise be for instrumentalists. Those of who use pedalboards or PODs will have to keep them and just not use what Bose has built in to the T1, simply because we can't switch the effects on the fly.

There's a workaround, but it ain't pretty...A/B switch and using two channels for the bass, each set up differently.
Mike in Texas & I just had a good chat about using the Para DI. I wanted to add something else that came out in our conversation. Some pieces of gear add coloration to the sound that is very pleasing (of course some others not so much). The Para DI might be necessary with the T1 if Mike's used to that tone & likes the coloration it adds.
Andrew,
Initially, I was thinking the same thing about a footswitch. I wanted one to control effects on the guitar. Now, I think I actually agree with Bose--I'll use my pedals. Yes, it is more stuff to bring, but for most acoustic players like me, we'd probably just use a touch of reverb from the Bose system anyway. I can add a chorus pedal, delay, etc. I use a looping device and need that along anyway. I just have everything set up on a pedal board. I think Bose wanted to keep a clean look to the system. I'll use the global effect (reverb) on guitar and vocals and anything else I'll get elsewhere.

On the other hand, why all of those effects if we can't switch them on and off without using our hands? Curious... And if I could just switch on a little bit 'o delay and a wee bit 'o chorus with a pedal, I may leave everything at home except the looping device.

I'm contradicting myself all over the place. Guys at Bose, help me understand this...
Hey ST,

I see what you mean (you're getting pretty predictable about this "being right" stuff - Mr. Munch too!) - SOMEWHERE, usually toward the end of the chain, it always gets down to a simple two, or three, plug output. Duh. I was just focusing on all the care we place on maintaining signal integrity, etc, and couldn't see how it could work without degradation. But... pretty decent odds the Bose engineers thought this through! :-)

Thanks, MIKE

(also thanks to you Tom, appreciate the call!)

... and PS - shouldn't EVERYTHING be controlled by a footswitch?!
quote:
Originally posted by Earthworm:
Andrew,
Initially, I was thinking the same thing about a footswitch. .....

On the other hand, why all of those effects if we can't switch them on and off without using our hands?


That's exactly the point. I have no problem keeping my POD, but it'd be great if I didn't have to use it. Pretty much any guitarist or bassist who uses effects has to switch them on and off while playing, so there's no point in using the effects in the T1 if they're not controllable via footswitch...they're simply moot. If I buy a T1, it won't be because it offers those effects.

The whole footswitch idea is in the "nice to have" category for some users, but not truly necessary.

Having said that, it ought to be a pretty simple engineering problem to create a USB multi-footswitch that Bose could sell to us for, oh, say, $499. You know, priced like all of this other gear...expensive enough that it hurts, but so cool that you have to get it anyway. Bose is fiendishly good at coming up with stuff like that.

Smile
quote:
there's no point in using the effects in the T1 if they're not controllable via footswitch


I dunno... I can't ever picture the L1 being able to give me what I want as a guitarist without some "outside" help... like the XT Live. I picture the T1 being the architect of my vocal (and acoustic solo/duo) sounds - so I no longer have to haul around a mixer and outboard gear for the vocal effects. As a guitarist - for a lot of different sounds and switching "on the fly" I'll stick to my tried and true foot pedals.
We've certainly thought about foot switches but its not entirely clear what a foot switch would actually do.

There is a whole lot of functionality in the T1. It doesn't look the part but there are about 400 parameters that can be adjusted or turned on/off, all of which are stored in a "scene". Which one of those should be foot accessible ?

For example, a Pod XT live has 11 switches plus one pedal, and that's only a single channel device. The T1 has four channels, all with multiple independent effects and controls and foot switches quickly get unwieldy and impractical.

For now, we'll have to get some real world experience under our belt and learn how our customers are using this system and in which scenarios a reasonably sized foot switch would really help. I'm confident that this message board will be invaluable in solving this problem.

Hope that helps

Hilmar
Hilmar;

Yes, therein lies the problem. Just what do you make switchable?

Just from my point of view, as a bassist, I'd want to be able to switch the few effects I do use on and off while playing. These include modulation (e.g. chorus) and overdrive (which I know the T1 does not offer...but I'd be fine using a separate pedal for that).

Being able to set the various parameters up in a scene and be able to switch scenes would be an elegant and flexible solution. Say, a four-button switch, with the ability to assign any scene/channel to any button.

This arrangement is similar to the POD. There are four preset footswitches. Of course the POD also gives access to many banks of four presets, but I've found it's overkill. Also, it's really impractical to switch banks AND preset during a song.

From a practical standpoint, we're all going to wind up using our existing pedalboards or some variation thereof anyway. It's just that it'd be nice to have a way to realistically use the effects you've given us in the common guitar/bass scenario where we need to be able to shut them off on the fly.
I have been reading this with interest even though it is not a feature I would normally use. However, if there was more storage for more scenes, then the footswitch could be a Three button affair. One to select channel, one to select scene, one to apply selections.

That would not allow on the fly changes of individual parameters within a scene, but might be helpful for changes between tunes.

O
basically i think the effects bose chose are good. lots of folks prefer their own types of pedals for certain effects. which i think is not much to bring along if one wants. basically i would use just probably the global part for maybe a little reverb , delay. im not much of a pedal person for what i play, but it was needed id find somethin to use if it had to be turned on and off in a song. At this point to me its no big deal that the effects are not footswitchable.
I think I'm with you on this, wfs. Not a real big deal to me. However, I can also imagine a world where I would only show up with the Bose system, mic stand and guitar. I'd have the ability to switch on and off a little bit of delay or chorus with my foot for the guitar through the T1. I wouldn't need a tuner--Bose put one in.
Exactly. I'd love that.

My BassPOD gives me all the effects, EQ, etc. etc. I need, and a tuner, and it's all easily accessible via footswitch.

So why do I need what's built into the T1?

For one thing I'd like to have less equipment. That was one of the reasons I bought the Bose system in the first place.

Also, chances are, knowing Bose, the Bose stuff is better.

Therefore, chances are I'd prefer to use it.

But without switching capability of some sort, I can't use it in the real world.

So it might as well not even be there.

Question for the -at-Bose-guys....

You've built in some effects that I simply cannot imagine anyone using without the abilty to switch on the fly, like flangers and phasers.

WHY?

Have you *ever* heard a piece of music performed with, say, a flanger present ALL THE TIME on a given instrument?

Makes no sense to me.
quote:
Originally posted by Andrew Douglas:
Question for the -at-Bose-guys....

You've built in some effects that I simply cannot imagine anyone using without the abilty to switch on the fly, like flangers and phasers.

WHY?

Have you *ever* heard a piece of music performed with, say, a flanger present ALL THE TIME on a given instrument?


Yeah, this is a head-scratcher for me as well. Why would you put in effects like flanger, phaser if you can't switch them on and off in a real performance context (i.e. your hands are busy)?

Oh, and I would spend a couple hundred to have the T1 effects foot control. It might be that I only bring the RC-50 Loop Station and the Bose system. Of course, you could also build a Looping system in and...
All of these posts about footswitches brings to light a major oversight in the design and engineering of the T1(tm).
No midi interface.
If the T1 had midi control you could easily turn on/off effects or change scenes with a midi foot controller. Performers that use sequencers for backing tracks would be able to program in effects changes into their sequences.

Robert L
Given that the physical engineering of the T1 is a done deal, we're not going to see that for quite a while. Years at least. Bose needs to recoup its investment before it changes the product.

However, there are USB MIDI interfaces. I suppose it could be possible in theory to rework the software to support one.

For example:

http://www.m-audio.com/products/en_us/Uno-main.html

That's the beauty of putting a standard computer interface into the T1. It gives Bose the ability to add features without rolling out an entirely new product, should they decide to do so.

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