Hi Everybody,

A little over 6 years ago Oldghm started a topic "Just a little something to brighten your day" which to this day still gets new posts and I'm sure brightens many people's days. It certainly has mine on many occasions.

As I don't want to derail Oldghm's thread, I thought I'd start a new topic which allows me to comment and talk about things which Oldghm probably didn't envisage at the time.

Although I've played in many bands, I've never stopped picking up a guitar and playing just for myself. I'm now 66 and have been doing this for 50 years. I always play for myself, but over the years people seem to enjoy listening to what I play and sing. Sometimes it's original stuff, but mostly covers of other people's music. Music which moves me in some way, or just music that I enjoy listening to.

The title of this thread is "Good Music is Timeless" and after watching the video I'm going to link to, I thought it might be a good idea start this topic in the hope that it might be interesting for a few readers here.

When I first started playing guitar I was really impressed and moved by  the music of James Taylor. At the beginning just a guitar and his voice. He's really inspired me in my musical journey through life. More than 50 years later I find that his music is just as fresh as it was back then. 

Here's the link to the video. It took place at Tanglewood and is a live performance of a song that James wrote about 50 years ago as a young man. This will still be fresh in another 50 years.

James Taylor with Yo-Yo Ma at Tanglewood

I hope you enjoy it.

Tony

Original Post

Here's another absolutely timeless song sung by someone who was hardly known when she died in November 1996 aged 33.

Eva Cassidy was launched as an artist after her death and became as timeless as many of the songs she covered. For me her best renditions were just herself alone with an acoustic guitar. This is such a song.

Eva Cassidy - Over the rainbow

I hope that she moves some of you as she moves me when I hear her play and sing this and other songs.

Tony

I have a lot of Eva's music, downloaded years ago, after hearing Fields Of Gold, that someone posted in the old (easier to navigate) Bose forum.  Time After Time was a great one too. 

Her story is tragic, so young, such a gifted singer.

I remembered after seeing your last reply, that I had listened to some of your music (audio, no video) when we first met here online.  You had a cajon player, and I mentioned that I didn't care for the "drum" sound.  I knew nothing about cajons then, and felt bad about telling you I didn't care for the drum sound

Now that I know much more about them, I still struggle with accepting them sonically.  I would prefer to play drums myself, by my ears, my back, and the volume needed at church, say "no".

Occasionally, I'll hear a cajon player play something that really fits the song, but it's rare.  I like to think that I play things that translate well, but when I see a video clip or a performance, I'm usually disappointed. 

But after 3 yrs with the church trio (2 acoustics & harmonies), I do feel that I have gotten much better on the cajon, but sorely miss some soft cymbals.

Thanks Tony for posting this for us.   I will be 64 here in a few days.  (Gulp!)  I have always been very open to ALL music and genres.  Sadly we've lost a lot in the techno/modern age and the changes in music.  Country really isn't country anymore......pop is so totally tech and less musical (of course in my being an old fart musician's opinion).    There is still great music by excellent artists but we have to search for it now instead of it being fed to us by the mainstream.   

    My older sister was a 60's child, I am a 70's child, and of course my parents dated and married listening to the 50's.   ALL of that played in our home daily.......a real blessing.   I truly believe I have lived in the greatest music era in history.    I too loved and learned guitar through James Taylor, Jim Croce, Cat Stevens, The Eagles, etc.   But here's the thing I'm most grateful of all for: 

      My shows of the 60's thru the 80's music crosses all generations and is enjoyed by everyone no matter their age.  The popularity of the show makes it easy to book venues.    Just last week a 9 year old came and asked me for an Eagles song.   This era of music has me seeing folks singing the words along with me all the time.   It's familiar and loved by so very many.  

    I think this is going to seriously affect the performing musician say 10 years from now.  The way music is fed through the mainstream is just totally different now and it's going to be difficult to put together a show playlist in the future because the masses of people will not be familiar with the artists.  Of course this only applies to cover musicians.   The great artists of yesteryear are either now dead, dying soon, or too old now to keep producing.  Many of the touring are having to give it up now.   

   I enjoy being able to be a part of keeping it all alive as much as I possibly can.  And the rewards and satisfaction still embrace me and my shows every week.  I am truly blessed.   

  Again, thanks for sharing this with us all.      Tom

Hi Tom,

I'm really glad you're enjoying the topic.

As I'm only 2 years older at 66 I found it a bit strange that you should say this:

Musicianthomas posted:

I am a 70's child, and of course my parents dated and married listening to the 50's. 

I definitely see myself as a 60's child even though I went to more concerts in the 70's. 

My parents ran an electrical store in Lancashire/England until the autumn of '62 when we moved to the country. In those days they sold basically everything from cookers/washing machines to TV's/record players and even records. 

My mother played piano until she married  and although my father didn't play any instrument whatsoever he had a good tenor voice and would often join in when he heard songs he knew.

The 60's in England were a real eye-opener as far as music went. Cliff Richard, The Shadows, The Beatles, The Stones Cream and lots of others made it to world fame and influenced the following musical generations. I was aware of all this music which is why I see myself as a 60's child.

Through my parents I also learned to enjoy Big Band music such as Glenn Miller, Count Basie, Benny Goodman etc. This was before the days of discos, and dances in those days were always to live music. My parents told me that they used to go dancing regularly. This was quit often to Big Bands which included such greats as Count Basie etc.

 I too loved and learned guitar through James Taylor, Jim Croce, Cat Stevens, The Eagles, etc.   But here's the thing I'm most grateful of all for: 

      My shows of the 60's thru the 80's music crosses all generations and is enjoyed by everyone no matter their age.  The popularity of the show makes it easy to book venues.    Just last week a 9 year old came and asked me for an Eagles song.   This era of music has me seeing folks singing the words along with me all the time.   It's familiar and loved by so very many.  

I see things about the same as what you're writing here, although I find that the 80's didn't offer me as much as the 60's and 70's. I enjoyed a fair amount of the music in the 80's but I found the previous 3 decades more interesting from my point of view. It is however refreshing that tastes do differ.

"Just last week a 9 year old came and asked me for an Eagles song." shows that the next generation is aware of music which was made more than 30 years before this child was born.

    I think this is going to seriously affect the performing musician say 10 years from now. 

You may well be right here, but I have a feeling that the "oldie but goldie" era will still be there for many years to come. The music is still aired regularly, and with Internet radio you have a great choice in music stations playing oldies.

The way music is fed through the mainstream is just totally different now and it's going to be difficult to put together a show playlist in the future because the masses of people will not be familiar with the artists.  Of course this only applies to cover musicians.   The great artists of yesteryear are either now dead, dying soon, or too old now to keep producing.  Many of the touring are having to give it up now.

I still haven't lost the hope that good music will still be made in the future. It is however becoming harder to find. I can't see the computer based music (techno) of today being as popular in 50 years time as the 60's still are today.

   I enjoy being able to be a part of keeping it all alive as much as I possibly can.  And the rewards and satisfaction still embrace me and my shows every week.  I am truly blessed.   

Yes, I feel the same.

  Again, thanks for sharing this with us all.      Tom

To be able to read such a post as yours Tom tells me that it was a good  decision to start this topic. You're more than welcome.

Tony

Hi Tom,

I just read this on your Website.

“If folks drive home with a nice memory in their heart pocket and a song stuck in their head…
...….then we’ve all had a fabulous night.”

That's a bit Déjà-vu for me because at the end of a gig I quite often say "If you've all enjoyed yourselves half as much as I have, then we've all had a super evening.

Tony

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