L1 Model II

Let's talk about the L1® Portable Line Array Systems

Using proprietary Bose® technology, L1 systems combine  PA and monitors into a single, highly portable unit. The  loudspeaker can be positioned behind or to the side —and you hear what the audience hears.

Highly portable PA and monitor combined for solo performers, DJs and general-purpose use. Fixed vertical control with 180° horizontal coverage Reduced vulnerability to feedback.

Three systems to choose from (Compact, Model 1S, Model II)
Two passive bass module options (B1 or B2)
Consistent coverage and tonal balance, portability and easy setup.

Hi. I have an acoustic duo (2 acoustic guitars, two mics) and we use the Bose L1 Compact with the Tonematch mixer. When we are in a large space or outdoors, the system sounds fantastic. But when we are in tight quarters, I am getting feedback, even when I move our mics to the side. I bought my unit used, so I can't say for sure how the previous owner had it set up, and I'm no expert on EQ settings. I was under the impression that we could stand almost right in front of the unit and not get feedback. (I've seen that done by others.)

So, are there any tips or tricks I can use to get my system under control?

Thanks!

Original Post
roberttee posted:

Hi. I have an acoustic duo (2 acoustic guitars, two mics) and we use the Bose L1 Compact with the Tonematch mixer. When we are in a large space or outdoors, the system sounds fantastic. But when we are in tight quarters, I am getting feedback, even when I move our mics to the side. I bought my unit used, so I can't say for sure how the previous owner had it set up, and I'm no expert on EQ settings. I was under the impression that we could stand almost right in front of the unit and not get feedback. (I've seen that done by others.)

So, are there any tips or tricks I can use to get my system under control?

Thanks!

Which mics are you using? 

Noise gates open and close the mic, so when you sing its open, and its closed otherwise, this helps keep extra unwanted noise out of the system thus less opportunity to feedback.

Compression is the glue, and really makes a better, more solid sound.  You can more volume and less feedback.

Cheers, James

roberttee posted:

@jdbassentertainment.com- I'm using a Fender mic that came with my old Passport system. My partner brings his own mic, which I'm embarrassed to say I don't know what it is. But I'm sure it's better than the Fender.

A few suggestions to manage feedback.

Use Beta 58a mics, they are feedback resistant with out you having to eat the mic...

Try putting the L1 Compact off to one side... maybe even a little ahead of you... in these feedback prone spaces. This should give you more gain before feedback. 

IMO adding noise gate might help, just make sure not to set it too high. I find that doing that can give you an unrealistic amount of gain before feedback setting that can actually make feedback issues worse. 

Corrective eqing... Notch out the offending frequencies.  I saved this one for last since it seem the most used technique and the least used properly. Be careful not to go too far in this department since it can really alter the way your voices sound in a bad way.   

As far as compression helping... it might help the sound be more consistent, but it's not I have never used it as a tool to solve feedback issues. 

my 2 cents 

I'm with ya. Bars are always louder than you think they will be.  In my 4-piece traditional bluegrass band, we had to eventually plug-in due to the loudness required. It seemed whenever we would raise the volume to be heard, people just talked louder.  We eventually went to 15" powered mains out front and use the Bose L1 behind us for monitor. We played mostly Milwaukee and WI and those people love their bars.

Hi roberttee,



roberttee posted:

Thanks again for the tips. The whole 'notching out frequencies' thing seems a bit daunting. Wish there was a tutorial video or more detailed info on that process. Maybe there is...?

"notching out frequencies" isn't needed most of the time.

Start with proper Gain Staging

Microphone technique is extremely important. See

Close Microphone Technique

Here's a video about ToneMatch Presets, zEQ  and ParaEQ  (used for notching out problem frequencies)

Don't get mesmerized by the "notching frequencies" issue. You can solve most feedback issues with proper gain staging, ToneMatch Preset, microphone technique, positioning of mics and L1 systems, tone controls (zEQ )

If you haven't been there yet, please see the article about Microphone Feedback

ST

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