Bose F1 Model 812 with F1 Subwoofer

Discuss the Bose F1 Model 812 and F1 Subwoofer here.

  • Live music performances
  • Bands of all styles
  • Solo musicians
  • Mobile DJs
  • Places of worship
  • Schools and universities
  • Resorts and hospitality venues
  • Business presentations

We recently performed at a High School prom. We ran the sound (2 F1 Stacks) off one breaker and the lights off the another. We put both subs under our table that was skirted. Typically the mixer I use (Denon X900) doesn’t have enough output to make signal lights flash red... they remain green. So typically we run the volume wide open giving the subs as much volume as possible. 

The dance went great and the F1 System sounded great as always, but towards the end of the dance my wife told me that the subs were really hot. I lifted up the table skirt and found that not only was it quite hot under the table, but the limit lights were on on both subs and the signal lights were solid red! So I turned them down to 2 O’clock and saw no change... Then on the next song I turned it down to 12 O’clock and continued the dance, surely that volume would be fine right? Nope, after inspection the limit lights were still coming on and the signal lights were still red... wow, so turned the volume down to 9 O’clock on the subs and finally the limit lights were off... 

This process went on for several songs... the F1 subs kept pumping out bass, but were hot and definitely sounded a bit weak at 9 O’clock... 

On a side note I was also getting a little less output on the F1 tops before they were in solid red territory, but I only had to turn them down a tiny to get them to behave.

Perhaps the power we were plugged into was weak? Perhaps the subs just needed more air? Has anyone experienced this? Ideas? Thanks in advance!! 

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@jdbassentertainment.com I haven't quite had the same experience as you, but my subs do get pretty warm by the end of the night. I've only ran them into the red a couple times, both for a short period of time. I run one stack on each side (stereo), so I've never coupled the subs under my table. My subs also still emit the glue smell when I get into bass-heavy hip hop, even though this is my 6th or 7th time using them at a gig.

A brown box allows me to determine the voltage without sagging. There are many power conditioners out there. A very handy item to use when gigging bars, schools or older buildings where power may vary. New equipment needs and new buildings supply 120 volts, older places may supply 115 volts or some time less. Tubes /vintage amps like less volts then the current standard of 120 volts. Suggestion get a power conditioner but I don't think that is the problem.

ccc posted:

A brown box allows me to determine the voltage without sagging. There are many power conditioners out there. A very handy item to use when gigging bars, schools or older buildings where power may vary. New equipment needs and new buildings supply 120 volts, older places may supply 115 volts or some time less. Tubes /vintage amps like less volts then the current standard of 120 volts. Suggestion get a power conditioner but I don't think that is the problem.

We were running the sound through a monster power conditioner with a voltage read out on the front and it read 122v at startup... but I never thought to look at it during this situation to see if the voltage had dropped??? Now I wish I had...

You'll want to make sure that the F1 Subs get plenty of ventilation. If the subs can't get rid of the heat in an enclosed area, it will create a vicious cycle where the voice coils and amplifier modules will heat up causing an increase in resistance and consequently less output despite the same gain setting.

Did you test the system at the maximum level you planned to play at before the guests arrived? If you're seeing red signal/clip indicators, your signal from your mixer is too hot. If you're seeing the LIMIT light come on, you're expecting too much from your subs or as I mentioned above, they cannot dissipate the heat thus forcing the system to protect itself.

Either way, if you want to produce more SPL than the subs can deliver, you'll need to bring more PA and ensure there is adequate ventilation. As engine enthusiasts like to say, there's no replacement for displacement and same applies to speakers.

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